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Accreditation Committee Decision

Brock University — Faculty of Education

Application for Renewal of Accreditation

Consecutive program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree

Concurrent program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree in the fifth year of study

Consecutive program of professional education with areas of study in Technological Education subjects at the Grade 9/10 and Grade 11/12 levels, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree or certificate

Integrated consecutive program of professional education focusing on Aboriginal Education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree (Aboriginal), identified in the application as the “Aboriginal Bachelor of Education Program”


Accreditation Committee Decision Regarding the Application for Accreditation Submitted by Brock University, Faculty of Education

Introduction

The Faculty of Education at Brock University submitted an application on August 22, 2011 for renewal of accreditation of the following programs of professional education:

  • Consecutive program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree
  • Concurrent program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree in the fifth year of study
  • Consecutive program of professional education with areas of study in Technological Education subjects at the Grade 9/10 and Grade 11/12 levels, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree or certificate
  • Integrated consecutive program of professional education focusing on Aboriginal Education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree (Aboriginal), identified in the application as the “Aboriginal Bachelor of Education Program”

In accordance with Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education programs, the Accreditation Committee established an accreditation panel to:

  • conduct a review of the aforementioned programs of professional education on the direction of the Accreditation Committee; and
  • act in an advisory role to the Accreditation Committee by reporting to the Committee on its findings and making recommendations to the Committee with respect to the programs reviewed.

The eight-person accreditation panel met the requirements set out in Section 6 of the Accreditation Regulation and was comprised as follows:

  • four members of Council, two of whom were members of the Accreditation Committee, and at least one appointed member of Council
  • two College members who were not Council members
  • a roster member with expertise in technological education programs and experience as an educator in a faculty of education
  • a person with expertise in Aboriginal teacher education programs who was nominated by the Faculty of Education at Brock University

In making its recommendations, the panel reviewed the application for accreditation and other supplementary documentation provided by the Faculty of Education at Brock University. The accreditation panel conducted a site visit at Brock University campuses located in St. Catharines and Hamilton, Ontario from November 20 – 25, 2011. One of the College members of the panel was unable to attend that portion of the review. During the site visit, the panel examined artifacts and program resources, toured the facilities where the programs are offered, and conducted interviews with faculty and stakeholders. Video conferencing was used to conduct interviews with educators from northern communities involved in the Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) program.

The accreditation panel invited the public to comment on the quality of the programs under review, however no submissions were received. The accreditation panel also provided an opportunity for program personnel and the public to attend an open forum meeting with the panel on November 25, 2011. No input was received.

Following the review, the accreditation panel compiled a draft report of its findings and recommendations for review by the Faculty of Education at Brock University. The final panel report submitted to the Accreditation Committee considers the comments provided by the Dean of the Faculty of Education in response to the draft report.

The Accreditation Committee, by virtue of the authority granted under the Ontario College of Teachers Act, 1996, and Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs, set out to determine if the programs of professional education in the application submitted by the Faculty of Education at Brock University qualified for accreditation.

In making its decision, the Accreditation Committee considered the Accreditation Panel Final Report dated May 11, 2012, a response from the faculty dean to the panel’s draft report received May 9, 2012, the Panel Chair’s presentation to the Accreditation Committee and the regulatory requirements of Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs.


Decision of the Accreditation Committee at its Meeting of
May 23, 2012

Requirements and Findings

The reasons for the Committee’s decision and the facts upon which it is based follow herein:

Requirement 1

The provider of the program is a permitted institution.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the Faculty of Education at Brock University is a permitted institution as defined in subsection 1. (1) of Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs.

According to Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs, a permitted institution includes a college, faculty or school of education in Ontario that is part of or affiliated with a university that is authorized to offer degrees under an Act of the Assembly.

Brock University is established as a university under The Brock University Act, 1964. Under the Act, the University has power to establish and maintain such faculties, schools, institutes, departments, chairs and courses as the Senate deems necessary and as shall be approved with respect to finances and facilities by the Board. The University has power and authority to grant any and all university degrees and honorary degrees and diplomas in all branches of learning.

Under the authority of the Act, the Faculty of Education can offer pre-service consecutive and concurrent Bachelor of Education degrees and Technological Education certificates through the Department of Teacher Education, and a Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) through the Tecumseh Centre.

In April 2007, the Senate of Brock University approved the establishment of the Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) degree program.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 1 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 2

The program has a clearly delineated conceptual framework.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the programs of professional education reviewed have a clearly delineated conceptual framework.

The teacher education programs are built historically on the Fuller (Teacher) Concerns Model and they are also enriched and informed by theories of Constructivism, Reflection, and the Learning Community. Through experience, reflection and guidance in courses and in the practica, teacher candidates develop and accept responsibility for their own understandings of teaching and learning. Knowledge is developed both on a personal basis and in the community of teacher candidates, experienced teachers and teacher educators.

The Triple C Cycle complements the conceptual framework by establishing course sequence and program integration. The Triple C Cycle refers to multiple opportunities to practice in a field setting and to build theory and practice on increasing insights and ideas. There are three essential elements to the Triple C Cycle: academic courses, Cohort and community. Academic courses have a framework of theory with practical application. Cohort is a term used for each section of the required course ‘Principles and Practices of Professional Certification’, for all programs. Cohort is the organizing structure for the practica and embeds the practica. Community represents field experiences, practicing teachers, and school administrators.

The conceptual framework was demonstrated in the application of reflective practice in teacher candidate assignments which required reflections on microteaching, and in lesson plans and course materials.

The Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) program is grounded in a “two worlds” or “two eyes seeing” conceptual framework, which respects both the Nishnawbe and mainstream cultures and is infused with the knowledge and values of both. The conceptual framework draws from three sources: Nishnawbek traditional knowledge, mainstream disciplines and knowledge, and the current teacher education model in place at Brock University. The conceptual framework emphasises the importance of community and reflects a commitment to the ethical use of Aboriginal knowledge and principles in a way that respects their origins and intentions while building teacher candidate knowledge and teaching skills.

Records management and handling of teacher candidate information and inquiries respects the “two worlds” approach of the program demonstrating that the conceptual framework has been integrated even at the administrative levels.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 2 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 3

The program is consistent with and reflects

  1. the College’s “Standards of Practice for the Teaching Profession” and the “Ethical Standards for the Teaching Profession”,
  2. current research in teacher education, and
  3. the integration of theory and practice in teacher education.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the programs reviewed are consistent with and reflect the Ontario College of Teachers’ Ethical Standards for the Teaching Profession and the Standards of Practice for the Teaching Profession, current research in teacher education, and the integration of theory and practice in teacher education.

The Standards are referenced throughout courses and are articulated in the Faculty of Education’s Teacher Candidate Handbook. The Standards are the basis for evaluative criteria in courses and the practicum and are fundamental to preparation for the practicum. The Standards also are evident through the organization and instruction for each of the Cohorts, a model which supports the culture of care, respect, trust and integrity that underlies the programs’ commitment to teacher candidates. The Standards also serve as evaluative criteria in courses and the practicum. Teacher candidates are expected to display integrity, reliability, and moral responsiveness.

Faculty members embed the Standards in their courses on a weekly basis, and the Standards are used in teaching the course Professionalism, Law, and the Ontario Teacher. Cohort advisors apply the Standards in case study discussions. Teacher candidates are knowledgeable about the Standards. The Standards are evident in course outlines and modelled by instructors in classes.  

In the Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) program, the Standards are modeled by the faculty members throughout the program. Professional and ethical conduct is expected of both faculty members and teacher candidates. Commitment to teacher candidates and their learning is inherent in the very nature of the program. The Bachelor of Education Aboriginal Teacher Development Course Guide includes an Aboriginal Ethical Use Statement on recognizing, valuing, and embracing ethical standards from indigenous ethical principles, a cross-cultural recognition that also reflects the application of the Standards of the College.

The programs are consistent with and reflect current research in teacher education. Critical elements of the teacher education programs are based on Darling-Hammond’s research in her text Studies in Excellence and include a common focus on good teaching in both course work and practicum, standards of practice, extended practicum, school–university partnerships, integration of theory-practice in courses, and a conceptual framework. Research by such theorists as Mitchell & Sackney, Schön, and Brookfield inform the programs. The program reflects the current research of such faculty members as Phillips (Tribes), Hutchison (social studies), Sydor (human rights, law), Rowsell (multi - literacies) and Volante (assessment). In the course on Assessment and Evaluation, the Ministry of Education’s Growing Success policy document (2010) is used, which includes the Ministry’s framework in assessment and background research. A faculty member with a research background has been hired for the Technological Education program. In the practicum, teacher candidates demonstrated knowledge in such current research areas as authentic assessment, differentiated instruction, critical thinking, inquiry circle, and descriptive feedback. Artifacts included published research documents by such faculty members as Cherubini, Kitchen, Volante, Wright and Hutchison, Pahl and Rowsell and McQuirter Scott.

The B.Ed. (Aboriginal) program reflects the work of both mainstream and indigenous researchers such as Fenwick, Nesbit and Spencer, Brigham and Gouthro, Battiste, Castellano, Paquette-Frenette, and faculty members such as Cherubini and Kitchen. Assignments and assessment methods reflect current research in teacher education and include learning journals, personal response papers, and observation activities.

The programs are consistent with and reflect the integration of theory and practice in teacher education. All programs contain elements of theory and application. The integration of theory and practice takes place within courses and between courses. The integration of theory and practice are integral to the teacher education program through its constructivist grounding and the Triple C Cycle.

In the Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) program, the initial courses introduce theories of Aboriginal education and learning based upon the work of Canadian Aboriginal educators such as Battiste, Castellano, Hampton, St. Denis and Kovach. Orientation material for instructors illustrates the integration of theory and practice, referencing both the research and knowledge of indigenous scholars and Elders and making connections to actual pedagogical practices. Guides for using discussion of two-eyes seeing introduce teacher candidates to the oral/written/visual world.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 3 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 4

The program curriculum is current, references the Ontario curriculum, includes the application of current research in teacher education, and represents a wide knowledge base in the divisions and components of the program.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the programs reviewed are current, reference the Ontario curriculum, include the application of current research in teacher education, and represent a wide knowledge base in the divisions and components of the programs.

The program curriculum in all programs is current. Courses for all the programs are structured around a standard of professional knowledge that includes teacher candidate development, learning theory, pedagogy, curriculum, ethics, educational research and related policies and legislation to inform professional judgment in practice. For example, the foundation course Current Trends and Issues in Special Education covers current legislation and recent developments related to the education of exceptional pupils. Cohort activities include preparation for practice teaching using current issues in education, such as diversity, Aboriginal education, multiculturalism, and literacy. Teacher candidates are aware of Ministry of Education initiatives such as the Ontario First Nation, Métis and Inuit Education Framework policy document. Candidates in the Technological Education program demonstrated knowledge of Ontario Curriculum, the Ontario Curriculum Framework, and Ontario curriculum policy documents.  Traditional and experiential learning are melded into courses, which recent research has affirmed as important in Aboriginal education courses. Recently published texts and articles as well as current materials from the indigenous perspective are in use in all courses.

The course outlines for the method and curriculum courses for all programs and divisions reference the respective Ministry of Education curriculum as well as related policies and initiatives. The Technological Education program referenced the respective Ministry of Education Technological Education documents for the current broad-based technologies. The courses in all programs include current Ministry of Education documents. In addition to the Ontario curriculum the course Professionalism, Law, and the Ontario Teacher includes Ministry of Education policy documents that relate to such areas as safe schools policy, code of conduct and bullying, the Education Act, Ministry of Education Ontario Schools Code of Conduct, 2001, and the Ontario Student Record (OSR) Guideline, 2000. Teacher candidates in the B. Ed. (Aboriginal) program receive copies of the relevant Ministry curriculum documents and use them as the basis for planning instruction and student assessment.

The curriculum includes the application of current research in teacher education in all programs. The course readings reflect best practices and research in the respective fields. Faculty members have a range of interests in research and include aspects of their research related to teacher development in their courses. Teacher candidates demonstrate proficiency with diagnostic and authentic assessments that take differentiation into account and can provide descriptive feedback through anecdotal comments based on their knowledge of current research. The Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) program, has been designed to apply recent research in teacher education. For example, the program recognizes the research of Hiebert, Morris, Berk, and Jansen with respect to journaling. The program incorporates past and current writings on adult education by Magro, Merriam and Caffarella. The linking of head, heart and hands is part of indigenous pedagogy. Traditional developmental approaches are taught alongside Aboriginal theories of child development.

The programs’ curriculum represents a wide knowledge base in the divisions and components of the program. Courses for all the programs  are structured around a standard of professional knowledge that includes teacher candidate development, learning theory, pedagogy, curriculum, ethics, educational research and related policies and legislation to inform professional judgment in practice. A wide knowledge base was demonstrated in course outlines, where course expectations include the demonstration of the ability to use curriculum planning resources such as periodical indexes, the World Wide Web, curriculum software, and databases to conduct searches for teaching and learning ideas. In addition to their formal in-class coursework, professional development opportunities for teacher candidates are offered at both the St. Catharines and Hamilton campuses. Topics include the Arts Conference, Social Issues Day, and the Technology Showcase Conference. The Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) Program is organized to provide connections among all parts of the program and with the local Aboriginal cultures. The Cohort model allows for continuity and communication with field partners. Course syllabi focused both on indigenous knowledge and mainstream theory and practice, thus integrating complex understandings of education.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 4 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 5

The course content of the program includes theory, method and foundation courses and appropriate provision for the application of theory in practice.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the course content for the programs reviewed include theory, method and foundation courses and appropriate provision for the application of theory in practice.

The course content in all the programs contained elements of theory and application. Teacher candidates apply theoretical constructs through classroom activities and assignments, and in the practica. Inclusion of theory is embedded in course outlines.

Courses in the programs provide relevant theory, such as constructivism, Bloom’s Taxonomy, and multiple intelligence theory. Teacher candidates were able to apply psychological education theories to classroom management during practica.

All programs include method and foundation courses. Each program has a course in general methods which contextualizes instructional methods within broader concepts such as philosophy of education and standards of practice. The general methods courses are extended by specific curriculum courses with particular applications to their subject matter, such as science, mathematics, language. Foundation courses in human development, assessment and evaluation, law, and special education are offered.

All programs make provision for the application of theory in practice through the general methods courses, and in course assignments that have practical applications to the classroom. Teacher candidates prepare and teach lessons which apply different theories such as active learning and multiple intelligence theories. Course instructors require teacher candidates to reflect on their practica and apply these reflections to course content.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 5 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 6

The program’s format and structure are appropriate for the course content.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the format and structure are appropriate for the course content for all programs of professional education reviewed.

The Faculty of Education at Brock University offers consecutive and concurrent programs in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, a Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) program for the Primary and Junior divisions, and a Technological Education Program for Grades 9 & 10 and Grades 11 & 12. The consecutive and concurrent programs are offered at Brock University’s two campuses in St. Catharines and Hamilton. The Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) Program is a community-based program and delivered through distance education, face-to-face classes at locations near Sioux Lookout, and a summer institute at the St. Catharines campus. The Technological Education program is offered only at the Hamilton campus.

The consecutive program is offered from September to May. The concurrent program is a five-year program, where teacher candidates complete an undergraduate degree and a Bachelor of Education degree. The two degrees, undergraduate and Bachelor of Education, must be completed at the same time. The concurrent program has the same teacher education core courses that the consecutive program has, and the majority of the teacher education program including the practica is offered in the concurrent final, fifth, year. In the concurrent program for the Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate divisions, two teacher education courses are taken before the fifth year. In the concurrent program for the Intermediate/Senior divisions, three courses are taken prior to the final, fifth year.

All programs immerse teacher candidates in a uniform program of study that emphasizes opportunities for collaboration, professional experiences in schools and reflection on teaching practice as teacher candidates develop their own constructs of teaching and learning, according to a constructivist framework. A pattern of courses mixed with field study and practice, the “Triple C Cycle”, allows teacher candidates to continually build their knowledge base and make connections with what they learn in courses and in the practica.

The components and courses are prescribed for all programs. Every program has the same set of courses: general methods, methods, curriculum, foundation courses, and  practica. Where there is differentiation, it is to meet the special conditions required by divisions (for example, teachable subjects) or the two-worlds curriculum of the Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) program.

Every program has a general methods course that provides a link to other courses. This course introduces concepts and skills with the expectation that instructors in other courses will extend and adapt the course components to their own context. Every program also has a required methods course Principles and Practices for Professional Certification which includes the Cohort and practicum, and this course provides additional practice opportunities for teacher candidates to master such elements as lesson planning. The practica in every program are connected to other course content through assignments, such as the development of lesson plans or instructional units. Curriculum courses are offered in each program and are specific to the Ministry of Education subject areas in the respective divisions.

Each Cohort functions as a base learning community which provides an orientation to the teacher education program and an introduction to key Ministry of Education policies and initiatives. Each Cohort is a group of up to 33 teacher candidates guided and instructed by faculty advisors. Cohort is also the organizing structure for the practica. Cohorts are distinguished one from another by first, a designation, and second, by an association with a specific school board and family of cooperating schools for the practicum. The Triple C Cycle refers to multiple opportunities (facilitated by Cohort) to practice in a field setting and to build theory and practice on increasing insights and ideas.

Courses in all programs are sequenced in such a way to prepare candidates for entry into their first practicum. The courses in the consecutive and concurrent programs total 6.0 full credits (and 6.5 total credits in J/I and I/S programs where French is a teachable subject). One full credit represents eighty hours of instructional time in the consecutive and concurrent programs, forty hours equals a 0.5 credit, and 20 hours equals a 0.25 credit.

Teacher candidates in all programs complete a minimum of 40 days of practical teaching experience in schools. The practicum blocks in all programs are designed as scaffolded experiences, with observation followed by practice teaching. The practicum blocks are spaced throughout the academic year.

The Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) program is a five-year, community-based program, held at sites near Sioux Lookout. The program includes one summer (Year 3) at the St. Catharines campus. The program reflects the “two worlds” conceptual framework through inclusion of both indigenous courses and content and courses reflecting Ontario requirements as stated in legislation and regulations. The program includes all the teacher education courses prescribed by the Faculty of Education for the Primary and Junior divisions. Wherever possible, the courses are adapted to the local First Nation culture, mainly through pedagogical approaches, examples and assignments. It is conducted on a Cohort basis where each group stays together and takes all courses together, over the five years of the program. Distance education is an essential part of the program. The first and third components of distance education are mediated by web-based learning technologies (written, oral and/or visual). The middle, three-week face-to-face sessions near Sioux Lookout take place in a study and living space that provides a culturally appropriate environment for activity-based learning and the inclusion of traditional ceremonies and practices. Facilities at the St. Catharines campus for the Year 3 summer session also provide a culturally appropriate environment. The teaching placements for the practicum are schools within the NNEC territory. Teacher candidates complete a minimum of 40 days of practical experience in schools, including observation and practice teaching, during three placements in the last two years of the program. Distance is unique to the program and has an effect on the nature of communication with teacher candidates. There are time zone changes that need to be accommodated. Multiple sources of technology, such as KNet, hotmail, gmail, and text messaging, are used to communicate with teacher candidates.

The Technological Education program is a consecutive program, and includes both methods and foundation courses appropriate for the study of technological education. The Technological Education Cohorts are organized to include several broad-based Technology clusters within the Cohorts. The Cohort structure groups teacher candidates for the practicum and the foundation and methods courses. Teacher candidates in the Technological Education program complete a minimum of 40 days of practical experience in schools. This is a combination of observation and practice teaching experience in grades 9/10 and 11/12.The Technological Education program totals 6.0 full credits. One full credit represents eighty hours of instructional time in the consecutive, and forty hours equals a 0.5 credit, while a credit of 0.5 was identified for each of the Technological Education teachable subjects. The Faculty of Education will be adding additional instructional hours to each of the Technological Education Grades 9 & 10 and Grades 11 & 12 method courses in 2012-2013.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 6 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 7

Students are assessed and informed of their progress on an ongoing basis throughout the program.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the teacher candidates are assessed and informed of their progress on an ongoing basis throughout all programs of professional education reviewed.

Teacher candidates receive ongoing formative and summative assessment throughout their programs from course instructors, faculty advisors and associate teachers. Brock University and Faculty of Education policies and practices in academic course grading, practicum practices and program design provide opportunities for feedback on teacher candidate progress. Course outlines indicate that assignments and assessment opportunities are staggered throughout the length of the courses with the result that teacher candidates receive feedback at regular intervals during each course.

The Teacher Education Handbook includes the Program Policies for Assessment, Grading and Evaluation which state that evaluation of a teacher candidate’s performance in a course will be determined by employing such indices as examinations, seminars, classroom participation, papers, lab and studio activities, and peer evaluation. Teacher candidates in all programs are organized into Cohorts, with several faculty members being assigned to each Cohort. As a result, the Cohort structure allows faculty members and faculty advisors to provide frequent and informed feedback to teacher candidates because of the facilitated communication across courses.

Associate teachers offer frequent and ongoing assessment during the practicum block, At times, this occurs daily. Feedback from associate teachers is both verbal and written. Written feedback is provided through a variety of program specific documents. The faculty advisors also visit teacher candidates during the practicum and assess the teacher candidates teaching a lesson using a performance-based rubric.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 7 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 8

The program includes a practicum that satisfies the requirements set out in subparagraph 2v of subsection 1(2) and subsection (2).

Subparagraph 2v of subsection 1(2) sets out that “…a program of professional education … includes … a minimum of 40 days of practical experience in schools or in other situations approved by the College for observation and practice teaching.”

Subsection 9. (2) sets out that the requirements for the practicum portion of the programs are as follows:

  1. The practicum must include observation and practice teaching in an instructional setting in schools or other situations that use the Ontario curriculum or in situations approved by the College.
  2. Revoked - see subparagraph 2v of subsection 1(2)
  3. The practicum enables every student to participate in settings related to each division and at least one of the subject areas of the program that are relevant to the student.
  4. An experienced teacher supervises the students and assesses their practicum.
  5. A faculty member is appointed as an advisor for each student.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the practicum for the programs reviewed includes a minimum of 40 days of practical experience that includes observation and practice teaching in instructional settings in schools or other situations that use the Ontario curriculum, or in situations approved by the College. The practicum enables every teacher candidate to participate in settings related to each division and at least one of the subject areas in the program relevant to the teacher candidate. An experienced teacher supervises and assesses the practicum, and a faculty member is appointed as an advisor for each teacher candidate.

Teacher candidates in all the programs reviewed complete a minimum of 40 days of practical experience in schools. P/J/I teacher candidates begin their field experience program in an internship, where the teacher candidates, working under the supervision of an associate teacher, familiarize themselves with the school and staff, and observe, assist, and possibly teach. The observation period is followed by practice teaching blocks spaced throughout the year. Teacher candidates in the Technological Education program complete a minimum of 40 days of practical experience in schools. Block One includes observation and practicum days in Grades 9 and 10. Block Two includes observation and practicum days in Grades 11 and 12. Block Three has observation and practicum days in a teacher candidate’s area of choice.

In all programs the practicum includes observation and practice teaching in an instructional setting in schools or other situations that use the Ontario curriculum or in situations approved by the College. The Teacher Candidate Handbook lists the Ontario District School Boards with which the Department of Teacher Education partners for the practicum in the consecutive, concurrent, and Technological Education programs. The schools within each listed school board are instructional settings that use the Ontario curriculum.

In all programs the practicum enables every student to participate in settings related to each division and at least one of the subject areas of the program that are relevant to the student. The Department of Teacher Education’s Policies and Procedures for Practice Teaching states that every teacher candidate will receive practice teaching experience in each of the divisional levels they are being certified to teach: Primary Division: Grades K - 3; Junior Division: Grades 4 - 6; Junior/Intermediate program placements are assigned Grades 4 - 8; Intermediate Division: Grades 7 - 10; and Senior Division: Grades 11 - 12. In one of the two blocks, J/I teacher candidates have a practicum in a classroom with an associate teacher who teaches the intermediate teachable subject required by the teacher candidate.

The practica in the Intermediate/Senior program incorporates the teacher candidates’ subject specialties. Intermediate/Senior General Studies teacher candidates will practice teach in one of their teachable subjects in the first practicum, and in their second teachable subject in the second practicum. The final, third, block allows teacher candidates to exercise choice. Block One of the Technological Education program includes observation and practicum days in Grades 9 and 10 broad-based Technological Education teachable subject. Block Two includes observation and practicum days in the same broad-based Technological Education teachable subject in Grades 11 and 12. Block Three has observation and practicum days in a teacher candidate’s area of choice.

In every program, an experienced teacher supervises the teacher candidates and assesses their practicum. Teachers are usually invited to become associate teachers in their third year of teaching. The teacher education program's Cohort structure contributes to an effective process for the selection of associate teachers for respective teacher candidates.

All practice teaching policies apply to out-of-region or alternative placements, and teacher candidates are supervised by Ontario certified associate teachers. In out-of-region placements, teacher candidates will be visited at the discretion of Brock faculty advisors.  

In all programs a faculty member is appointed as an advisor for each student. Each teacher candidate is a member of a Cohort that has a minimum of two faculty advisors who supervise teacher candidates during the practica.

The Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) program operates under the same policies and procedures as the other teacher education programs offered at Brock University. Any differences in the Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) program are additional elements that incorporate the “Two Worlds” approach to curriculum.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 8 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 9

Successful completion of the practicum is a requirement for successful completion of the program.

Findings

The evidence indicates that successful completion of the practicum is required for successful completion of the programs reviewed.

The course Principles and Practices for Professional Certification, which includes the practicum, is required in all programs. Successful completion of this course includes successful completion of the practicum. The Faculty of Education’s Teacher Candidate Handbook for the consecutive, concurrent, and Technological Education programs states that teacher education candidates in all programs will be unsuccessful in the teacher education program if they are not successful in the course Principles and Practices for Professional Certification.

The Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) program requires successful completion of each practice teaching placement for successful completion of the program. The Teacher Candidate Handbook states that the teacher education program is failed if the course Principles and Practices for Professional Certification, Primary/Junior, is failed.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 9 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 10

The teaching method courses in the program are appropriate in relation to the divisions to which they relate.

Findings

The teaching method courses in the programs reviewed are appropriate in relation to the divisions to which they relate.

Each program has at least one general methods course that provides the instructional base for knowledge, skills and attitudes related to appropriate divisions. These divisional general methods courses examine topics such as instructional approaches, curriculum development and delivery, and current curriculum issues. Additionally, all programs require a methods course called Principles and Practices for Professional Certification. This course provides for integration with the divisional general methods course through reflective practice, analysis and guided application during the practicum.  The curriculum subject courses for the P/J divisions, the J/I divisions including the teachable subject for the Intermediate division, and the “teachable subjects” for the I/S divisions offer methods appropriate to the subject content.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 10 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 11

The teaching theory and foundation courses in the program include courses on human development and learning and on legislation and government policies relating to education.

Findings

The evidence indicates that all programs include courses on human development and learning and on legislation and government policies relating to education.

Classroom Dynamics, a course required in every program and in every division, has an emphasis on child and adolescent development and learning. Special Education is a course required in all programs and divisions and focuses on issues of differences in learning needs based on developmental diversity.

A required course in all programs and divisions is Professionalism, Law and the Ontario Teacher and has as its subject matter the legal framework for public education in Ontario. The course references such legislation as the Education Act and its regulations, The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Ontario College of Teachers Act, and the Teaching Profession Act. In every program, the course elements are similar and include the Ontario College of Teachers’ Standards of Practice, professional ethics, duties of teachers and principals, duty of care, and legislation relating to schools, school boards, and school councils. The companion course to Professionalism, Law and the Ontario Teacher is the required course, Current Trends in Special Education which includes how the law applies to special education in Ontario public schools. Course outlines for the broad-based subjects in Technological Education also referenced the Ontario Council of Technology Educators’ website and sections related to health and safety legislation. The course Professionalism, Law, and the Ontario Teacher has been adapted for Aboriginal teacher candidates, who will be prepared to teach on- or off-reserve, by including relevant parts of the Indian Act and a consideration of its influences on schools on reserves.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 11 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 12

The faculty members teaching the program are an appropriate combination of,

  1. persons with appropriate academic qualifications,
  2. practitioners with appropriate experience in the field of education, and
  3. persons with appropriate expertise in the divisions and components of the program.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the faculty members teaching in the programs of professional education are an appropriate combination of persons with appropriate academic qualifications, practitioners with appropriate experience in the field of education, and persons with appropriate expertise in the divisions and components of the program.

Faculty members include a combination of tenure-stream and part-time instructors. Faculty members are expected to hold master’s or doctoral degrees and have at least five years of successful teaching experience in public schools, although in some cases, professional experience may be recognized in place of a master’s degree.

Full- and part-time faculty members hold such additional teaching qualifications as supervisory officer’s qualifications, principal’s qualifications, additional and specialist qualifications in many program components and subject areas, Technological Instructors are practitioners with specialist qualifications in Technological Education and/or Industrial Arts. Tenure-stream faculty have broad and varied experience in the field of education. Tenure-stream faculty members act as “team leaders” in their subject specialty and coordinate the focus of courses they teach in collaboration with part-time instructors.

Necessary qualities for instructors of the Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) program include being knowledgeable of the Nishnawbe language and culture, teaching the two worlds curriculum, and specific knowledge related to the northern context, local cultures and the values of land based communities. Faculty course designers are trained in the appropriate distance education and site based delivery methods specific to the program.

Elders bring expertise in indigenous knowledge and pedagogic practice and work with the program to share their knowledge and provide direction. They attend regularly to support the indigenous language courses.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 12 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 13

The permitted institution maintains adequate internal controls to preserve the integrity of student records relating to the program.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the Faculty of Education at Brock University maintains adequate internal controls to preserve the integrity of student records relating to all programs reviewed.

Brock University and the Faculty of Education follow strict guidelines in protecting the privacy and integrity of teacher candidate records. The University collects and retains teacher candidate and alumni personal information under the authority of The Brock University Act, 1964.  Personal information provided for admission and registration and any other information placed into the teacher candidate record is collected, protected, used, disclosed and retained in compliance with Ontario’s Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). The Brock Access to Student Records and Disclosure of Information Policy sets out specific provisions concerning access to and release of student records, and the security of student records.

The Office of the Registrar has the primary responsibility for the collection, storage, utilization, and dissemination of student records. Responsibilities include maintaining the accuracy of information in student records, that information in student records is not used inappropriately for a purpose other than which it was collected, and that the privacy of students and former students is not invaded through disclosure of information in student records to third parties without the necessary authorization. The Registrar manages the collection, storage, utilization and dissemination of student records using specific guidelines.

Brock University’s controls and security measures also apply to the Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) program. The Program Coordinator provides grade results to the Northern Nishnawbe Education Council (NNEC) Director of Life Long Learning for preparation of annual reports, as required by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and as a basis for continued individual teacher candidate funding. Students in this program sign a consent form that allows their grades to be provided to the NNEC.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 13 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 14

The permitted institution is committed to continuous improvement and quality assurance of the program and, if the program is an existing program, has implemented measures demonstrating that commitment.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the Faculty of Education at Brock University is committed to continuous improvement and quality assurance for all programs of professional education reviewed and has implemented measures demonstrating that commitment.

Brock University has two mechanisms to ensure continuous improvement and quality assurance of its programs. The first is the Institutional Quality Assurance Processes (IQAP) for academic reviews in accordance with the Quality Assurance Framework required by the Council of Ontario Universities. Implementation of the IQAP was approved by the Brock University Senate in May 2010. The second mechanism is the Academic Review Committee (ARC) which is a special committee of Senate responsible for the implementation of academic reviews under IQAP. ARC places all faculty programs within the University on a schedule of reporting and review.

The Department of Teacher Education undertook a program review from 2005-2009 with a framework of outcomes and principles. The Program Committee has responsibility for maintaining the quality and currency of its programs. The Department conducts regular retreats for faculty members to review and improve the teacher education programs. Examples of the Department of Teacher Education’s commitment to quality assurance include the 2010 reaffirmation of its commitment to the constructivist model and to the appropriateness of the Triple C Cycle to the teacher education programs.

In response to hiring practices in school boards, the Faculty of Education Advisory Committee, which fulfills the function of a Teacher Education Advisory Committee, provided feedback that led to Brock increasing the number of teacher candidates in French as a Second Language and Technological education. Course evaluations are completed by teacher candidates for every course. As part of the quality assurance process, feedback is solicited from schools and school boards by the Program Coordinator about the process of practice teaching placements. Faculty advisors also receive informal feedback from associate teachers and principals when they visit schools to supervise teacher candidates.

The Aboriginal program has a Tecumseh Centre-NNEC Program Executive Committee composed of Brock faculty and NNEC staff. The Program Executive Committee ensures that all courses, content, and instructional approaches meet Brock University requirements, include Aboriginal knowledge wherever appropriate, and are responsive to Nishnawbek cultural values.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 14 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 15

The program has a Teacher Education Advisory Committee or similar body that functions in an advisory or liaison capacity in relation to the program.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the Faculty of Education has a Faculty Education Advisory Committee (FEAC) which fulfills the functions of a Teacher Education Advisory Committee for all programs reviewed.

The FEAC meets twice per year and acts in an advisory capacity in relation to the teacher education programs, providing feedback on the programs. Membership of the FEAC included representation from the Faculty of Education, Department of Teacher Education, Tecumseh Centre, Brock University Senate, Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, and provincial supervisory and principal associations. The Director of the Tecumseh Centre is a member of FEAC. The Committee is chaired by the Dean (or designate) of the Faculty of Education and minutes for these meetings are maintained by the Secretary to the Associate Dean.

Optional courses in Aboriginal Education and Kindergarten were created for teacher candidates in the consecutive, concurrent and Technological Education programs as a result of advice given through the FEAC. The impact of government initiatives was discussed during meetings, and the impact these initiatives would have on universities and school boards.

FEAC’s discussion topics included the Early Learning Kindergarten Program, the need for physical literacy in teacher education, and strategies to attract applicants of cultural and ethnic diversity.

There is also the Tecumseh Centre-NNEC Program Executive Committee, which ensures that all courses, content and instructional approaches meet Brock University requirements, as well as being responsive to Nishnawbek cultural values. Membership includes the Director, Tecumseh Centre, a Faculty of Education Associate Professor, Coordinator, Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) P/J for Brock University, Director, Life Long Learning for NNEC, Coordinator, Bachelor of Education P/J for NNEC, and a Student Counselor, NNEC.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 15 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.


Decision of the Accreditation Committee

General Accreditation

For the reasons set out above, the Accreditation Committee finds that the following programs of professional education offered by the Faculty of Education at Brock University fully satisfy the requirements of Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs:

  • Consecutive program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree
  • Concurrent program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree in the fifth year of study
  • Consecutive program of professional education with areas of study in Technological Education subjects at the Grades 9/10 and Grades 11/12 levels, leading to a Bachelor of Education Degree or certificate
  • Integrated consecutive program of professional education focusing on Aboriginal Education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree (Aboriginal), identified in the application as the “Aboriginal Bachelor of Education Program”.

The Accreditation Committee grants general accreditation to these programs for a period of seven years until May 23, 2019 or for an amended period of time that is in accordance with Section 15 of Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs.

Accreditation Committee
Ontario College of Teachers
May 23, 2012


Program Change Decision for Combined Concurrent Studies Program (Previously known as integrated consecutive program)

Read the Full Decision

The Faculty of Education at Brock University, the “Faculty”, submitted a program change application on October 6, 2015 to modify the program site and delivery partner for the following accredited program of professional education:

  • Concurrent program of professional education that combines studies in Aboriginal Education with an area of study in the Primary/Junior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree (Aboriginal), identified in the application as the "Aboriginal Bachelor of Education Program" and previously known as an “integrated consecutive program”

The Accreditation Committee confirms that the program, as modified, continues to qualify for general accreditation without conditions until the existing expiry date of May 23, 2019 or for an amended period of time that is in accordance with Section 15 of Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs.

Accreditation Committee
Ontario College of Teachers
October 29, 2015


Decision Regarding the Enhanced Teacher Education Program Verification Report

Read the Full Decision

Confirmation of Accreditation

The Accreditation Committee finds that the following programs of professional education offered by the Faculty of Education, Brock University fully satisfy the accreditation requirements of Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs as they read on September 1, 2015:

  • Consecutive program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree
  • Concurrent program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree in the fifth year of study
  • Bachelor of Education, Primary/Junior (Aboriginal): A concurrent program of professional education that combines studies in Aboriginal Education with an area of study in the Primary/Junior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree (Aboriginal), identified in the application as the “Aboriginal Bachelor of Education Program”
  • Consecutive program of professional education with areas of study in Technological Education subjects at the Grades 9/10 and Grades 11/12 levels, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree or certificate

The Accreditation Committee confirms general accreditation of these programs to continue until May 23, 2019.

Accreditation Committee
Ontario College of Teachers
April 8, 2016

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