101 Bloor Street West
Toronto ON, M5S 0A1
P: 416-961-8800
Toll Free (Ontario Only): 1-888-534-2222
F: 416-961-8822
info@oct.ca

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Find a Teacher

Workshops

Tuesday, June 2, 2020
Workshop Series 1
10:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Presented by:
Richard Steinecke, Counsel, Steinecke Maciura LeBlanc
Natasha Danson, Associate, Steinecke Maciura LeBlanc

Session ID: PR-1EF
(English with simultaneous interpretation)

Perhaps the aspect of professional regulation with the least consensus in our society is the regulatory reach into the private lives of practitioners. Whether it be controversial ways of letting off steam, expressing political or religious opinions, or posting on social media, disciplinary action invariably involves imposing value judgments about what kind of behaviour or comment undermines public confidence in the profession and has the potential to harm students, clients or patients. Using real-life examples, this workshop explores the principles that apply to regulators in evaluating the dividing line separating a person’s privacy and autonomy from profession-based censure.

Presented by:
Rumeet Billan, PhD, President and Chief Executive Officer, Viewpoint Leadership

Session ID: PI-1E
(English)

This interactive workshop incorporates the capabilities of building Psychological Capital (PsyCap) and the competencies of Emotional Intelligence (EI), which is the capacity of recognizing our own feelings —and those of others — and for regulating those emotions. Research shows that building PsyCap and developing high EI are significant factors in leadership success, and that these capabilities can be learned. How leaders process emotions has a direct impact on self-perception and how they express themselves to others. It also impacts relationships, the decisions that are made, and how well leaders are able to tolerate stress. Being emotionally intelligent is about using emotions in the most effective way in day-to-day interactions and in the work that we are engaged in.

Presented by:
Staff from the Ontario College of Teachers
Staff from the Ontario Ministry of Education

Session ID: OCT-1E
(English)

This practical workshop will help school board staff responsible for the assignment of teachers to teaching positions understand how qualifications are granted by the Ontario College of Teachers and the requirements governing teaching assignments in Ontario schools as per the Ontario Ministry of Education.

Presented by:
Rosanna Ruppert, Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) Skills Practitioner

Session ID: PI-1aE
(English)

This interactive workshop will leave you with a set of concrete skills you can use daily to help regulate emotions and create mental health resilience for all. These evidence-based skills, currently available in the professional mental health space, can be brought into your personal and professional lives to create a calmer, kinder environment in all areas of your life.


Tuesday, June 2, 2020
Workshop Series 2
12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Presented by:
Larry Meyer, Federal Bureau of Investigation (retired)
Samantha Chonski, Child Victim Advocate

PI-2E
(English)

In September 2009, the mother of a 15-year-old girl living in Phoenix, Ariz., contacted the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children to report her daughter was being extorted to produce sexually explicit images by an unknown individual via Myspace. Three months later, 26-year-old Lucas Michael Chansler, a resident of Jacksonville, Fla., was identified as the likely suspect behind the predatory exploitation of the victim. This initial complaint initiated one of the largest online child exploitation cases investigated by the FBI and brought to light new means pedophiles were using to produce child pornography and sexually exploit children via the internet. Those who should attend include organizations whose mandate is to serve and protect the public, and employers of Ontario Certified Teachers.

Presented by:
Dr. Amy Cheung, Associate Scientist, Evaluative Clinical Sciences, Canadian Safe Schools, Hurvitz Brain Sciences Research Program at Sunnybrook Research Institute and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto Network

Session ID: PI-2EF
(English with simultaneous interpretation)

Suicide is the second leading cause of death of young Canadians. This workshop will highlight the risk factors for suicide in youth and what educators can do to assist students at risk for suicide in the educational setting. This session will also provide strategies for practitioners to use in their current work locations.

Tuesday, June 2, 2020
Workshop Series 3
2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Presented by:
Darrel I. Pink, Steinecke Macuira LeBlanc

Session ID: PR-3EF
(English with simultaneous interpretation)

The evolution of professional regulation is causing regulators to look at the risk of harm to the public as a key aspect of their work. Not all poor behaviour is the same, and not all mistakes result in the same harm. Therefore, it is imperative regulators look at what risks they are responsible for and what risky behaviour their registrants engage in. By developing an understanding of risk, regulators can better manage resources, target areas where their work will make a difference, engage differently with the profession, and be more effective. This interactive workshop will require participants to look at their own regulatory environment, identify key risks and then develop responses to them. It will involve discussing risk profiles, developing a risk matrix and articulating the “risks of harm” that should be a priority. With this information, participants will begin to design — or expand their approach to and use of — risk-based regulation.

Presented by:
Janelle Blackadar, Police Office, Child Exploitation Section Service

Session ID: PI-3E
(English)

The Toronto Police Service is dedicated to the protection of children from exploitation both online and in person. With the expansion of technology, social media and youth trends, children are increasingly at risk of online exploitation, which can also lead to ramifications in the real world. This presentation will focus on the variety of internet-related exploitation occurrences and how the Toronto Police Service conducts both reactive and proactive investigations that play an integral role in disciplinary actions undertaken by regulatory bodies. It will also address online safety tips for parents and teachers.

Presented by:
Staff from the Ontario College of Teachers
Staff from the Ontario Ministry of Education

Session ID: OCT-3F
(French)

Cet atelier pratique aidera le personnel des conseils scolaires responsable des affectations en enseignement à comprendre comment l’Ordre des enseignantes et des enseignants de l’Ontario accorde les qualifications à ses membres et comment le ministère de l’Éducation autorise ensuite les affectations en enseignement.

Presented by:
Frederick Lane, Privacy Expert and Author

Session ID: PI-3aE
(English)

In the five years since the original publication of Cybertraps for Educators, mobile devices (particularly smartphones) have become an essential feature of contemporary society. These omnipresent devices have reshaped our society, moulding the way we interact with the world and with each other. Endless entertainment and remarkable capabilities are literally at our fingertips, but so too are a wide range of potential cybertraps. Using the newly released Cybertraps for Educators 2.0 as its starting place, this presentation will review some of the newest and most pressing risks that digital technologies pose for educators. A particular focus of the talk will be on the recently proposed Model Code of Ethics for Educators and the tools it provides in helping educators to minimize the risks of cybertraps.


Tuesday, June 2, 2020
Workshop Series 4
3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Presented by:
Yasmin Rajabi, Project Officer, Brookfield Institute for Innovation + Entrepreneurship
Diana Rivera, Economist, Brookfield Institute for Innovation + Entrepreneurship

Session ID: PR-4E
English

Join the Brookfield Institute for Innovation + Entrepreneurship (BII+E) at Ryerson University as we share insights on what employment might look like in 2030. We will explore how a wide range of complex trends from automation to climate change may intersect to impact the Canadian labour market in the next 10-15 years, and present selected results from our occupational forecast and skill analysis.

In particular, we identify some of the foundational skills important for both students and workers to future-proof themselves and take advantage of emerging opportunities in the labour market.

Presented by:
Melisse Willems, Registrar and Executive Director, College of Dietitians of Ontario

Session ID: PR-4aE
(English)

This session will cover some of the ins and outs of social media as it relates to professional regulation. Topics will cover whether and how regulators can use social media to educate, regulate and investigate. This session will also look at the emerging views of what professionalism means in the online world. What are the boundaries of "professional" when the interaction is virtual? Are some behaviours "fair game" when they play out online that would otherwise be forbidden? What are best practices and standards for the use of social media by regulated professionals? And what are the risks and benefits for regulators to being on social media? This session will identify many questions, provide some answers, and give attendees something to tweet about.

Presented by:
Yvan Brochu, OCT, EdD, Adjunct Instructor, Queen's University
Em Del Sordo, OCT, MEd , Student Achievement Officer, Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board

Session ID: OCT-4E
(English)

Public education provides an opportunity to powerfully impact not only the lives of our students and staff but also communities locally and beyond. One way to achieve this is by launching a new school vision that includes the collective voices of all stakeholders — students, parent, community members and staff. This presentation will share how a new school vision can not only serve to act in the public interest and adhere to professional regulations, but also address critical issues and create conditions for learning together for employers, employees, students and community members.

We will detail the journey of Dundas Valley Secondary School’s vision process, which led to the Premier’s Award for Accepting Schools in 2017. The vision revealed a collective desire for an inclusive school climate — a socially and emotionally healthy place for all — where student well-being and achievement would be front and centre, and students would become change agents within their community and beyond.

Presented by:
Chantal Bélisle, OCT, Director of Investigation and Hearings, Ontario College of Teachers
Jamie Guerra, OCT, Intake Co-ordinator, Ontario College of Teachers
Marie-France Wilson, Senior Investigator, Ontario College of Teachers
Patrick Winter, Intake Officer, Ontario College of Teachers

Identifiant de séance : OCT-4aF
(French)

Il incombe aux employeurs de signaler à l’Ordre certaines accusations criminelles portées contre un membre et certains cas de faute professionnelle. Dans le cadre de cette séance, vous étudierez en quoi consiste la responsabilité de communiquer l’information et vous apprendrez à déterminer quand préparer un rapport, quoi y inclure et comment le présenter. Découvrez la démarche d’enquête et le processus de traitement des plaintes de l’Ordre.


Wednesday, June 3, 2020
Workshop Series 5
9:45 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Presented by:

Janice Duggan, LL.B., Manager of Investigations, Ontario College of Teachers
Pauline Walters, Manager, Intake and Compliance, College of Early Childhood Educators
Kim Williams, Manager, Investigations, College of Early Childhood Educators

Session ID: PR-5EF
(English with simultaneous interpretation)

Professionals interacting with children and youth can face challenges when determining where, precisely, to draw the line on appropriate boundaries. The challenge is heightened when rogue practitioners use caring as a pretext to take advantage of vulnerable people — often called “grooming.” Our panel will explore how professional regulatory bodies assess and address these challenges using real-life examples, and ask what you might do in similar situations.

Presented by:
Matthew Sheahan, OCT, Drama and Indigenous Education Teacher, Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
Troy Maracle, OCT, Indigenous Education Lead Teacher, Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board

Session ID: PI-5E
(English)

Following the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action in 2015 and the Calls for Justice in 2019, learning about Indigenous issues, knowledge and history is of utmost importance to today’s students. What is required is a positive, productive pedagogy to access Indigenous stories and topics without the appropriation of voice or culture. The Council of Ontario Drama and Dance Educators (CODE), in consultation with members of the First Nations, Métis & Inuit Education Association of Ontario (FNMIEAO), has created a resource with a list of strategies to assist educators in navigating this difficult landscape. This workshop will work through suggestions in this resource using practical demonstrations of drama-based activities free from appropriation of voice, adaptable to multiple disciplines and grades. All leaders in education need to be aware of appropriation challenges facing educators and how to do this work in a positive way — both inside the classroom and in performance.

Presented by:
Chantal Bélisle, Director of Investigations and Hearings, Ontario College of Teachers
Janice Duggan, LL.B., Manager of Investigations, Ontario College of Teachers
Marie-France Wilson, Senior Investigator, Ontario College of Teachers

Session ID: OCT-5E
(English)

Employers of Ontario Certified Teachers have a responsibility to report certain criminal charges against members and incidents of professional misconduct. Attend this session to learn about when you need to compile a report, how and what to report, and an employer’s responsibility to share information. Learn what happens during the College’s investigation and how complaints are processed.

Presented by:
Blaise Aguirre, MD

Session ID: PI-5aE
(English)

Validation has been described as a way to acknowledge and accept someone’s feelings, thoughts, behaviours and internal experiences as valid and understandable. Practising validation can help vulnerable youth feel they are heard, making it easier for them to communicate their thoughts, feelings and experiences.

Building on his keynote address, Dr. Aguirre will demonstrate the application of validation to specific situations through role play. Those attending this workshop should expect to participate in these role-play activities. The application of validation to all or some of the real-life and real-work examples will be demonstrated.

After the role-play demonstrations, workshop participants will break up into groups of three to practise new techniques.


Wednesday, June 3, 2020
Workshop Series 6
11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Presented by:
Caroline Zayid, LL.B., National Litigation Practice Group Leader and Partner, McCarthy Tétrault LLP

Session ID: PR-6EF
(English with simultaneous French interpretation)

Most of the work of self-regulation happens within the professional organization through the decisions of tribunals, committees and other statutory decision-makers. However, that work must be carried out within a framework set by the courts, which are empowered to review regulatory decisions, interpret legislation and apply legal requirements. This workshop will present the top recent court decisions of importance to regulators. We will discuss practical implications and emerging trends to guide future regulation.

Presented by:
Usha Shanmugathasan, OCT, Havergal College

Session ID: PI-6E
(English)

What are microaggressions and why do they matter? Psychologist Dr. Derald Wing Sue, author of Microaggressions in Everyday Life, defines them as “brief, everyday exchanges that send denigrating messages to certain individuals because of their group membership." Identifying and dismantling the oppressive nature of microaggressions is vital in order to create a society that values and is committed to the well-being of its members. Join us for this informative workshop where we will unpack the impact of microaggressions and what to do about them.

Presented by:
A. Luanne Martin, OCT, Retired Educator, Mohawk Turtle Clan
Catherine Jamieson, OCT, Retired Educator

Session ID: OCT-6E
(English)

In this day and age of Truth and Reconciliation, it is important to remember that reconciliation is a verb: it requires action driven by efforts of reconciliation. Let’s discover where we are in our efforts to reconcile with the historic and contemporary truths of First Nations, Métis and Inuit in the Canadian context, and pay closer attention to Haudenosaunee epistemology as it unfolds through wampum. The conversation will then turn to professional inquiry into the Ethical Standards for the Teaching Profession using the new Haudenosaunee artworks and explanations, with a collective and personal interpretation of the images developed through audience participation. Feedback from the audience on perceived critical issues in the area of Indigenous teachings in schools within the context of the Professional Learning Framework will assist participants to map out next steps.

Presented by:
Judith Nyman, Director of Program Policy and Lead, French as a Second Language — Labour Market Partnership Project, Ontario Public School Boards’ Association
David Jack, Research Lead, French as a Second Language — Labour Market Partnership Project 

Session ID: OCT-6aE
(English)

This presentation is intended for a wide audience of educators with interest in the supply and demand of French as a Second Language (FSL) teachers in Ontario. The presentation will be grounded in the ongoing work of the FSL — Labour Market Partnership Project, a three-year initiative that began in 2017 to better understand the issues related to the recruitment, hiring, retention and professional support of FSL teachers. The presentation will include a summary of the project’s research findings to date, actions taken by various stakeholders based on the findings, and results from multiple pilot projects across the province. Participants will also engage with a panel of project stakeholders to hear various perspectives regarding the supply and demand of FSL teachers in Ontario.

101 Bloor Street West, Toronto ON, M5S 0A1, P: 416.961.8800 / Toll Free (Ontario Only): 1.888.534.2222 / F: 416.961.8822 / info@oct.ca

© 2020 Ontario College of Teachers

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