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Accreditation Committee Decision

Lakehead University - Faculty of Education

Application for Renewal of Accreditation

Consecutive program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree

Concurrent program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree, including a concurrent “Native Teacher Education Program” (NTEP Concurrent)

Single-degree consecutive program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior divisions, leading to a four-year Honours Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) degree

Multi-session consecutive program of professional education with an area of study in teaching Native Languages, leading to a Diploma in Education (known as “Native Language Teachers’ Certification Program” or NLTC).

Introduction

The Faculty of Education at Lakehead University submitted an application on December 16, 2011 for renewal of accreditation of the following programs of professional education:

  • Consecutive program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree
  • Concurrent program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree, including a concurrent “Native Teacher Education Program” (NTEP Concurrent)
  • Single-degree consecutive program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior divisions, leading to a four-year Honours Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) degree
  • Multi-session consecutive program of professional education with an area of study in teaching Native Languages, leading to a Diploma in Education (known as “Native Language Teachers’ Certification Program” or NLTC).

In accordance with Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education programs, the Accreditation Committee established an accreditation panel to:

  1. conduct a review of the aforementioned programs of professional education on the direction of the Accreditation Committee; and
  2. act in an advisory role to the Accreditation Committee by reporting to the Committee on its findings and making recommendations to the Committee with respect to the programs reviewed.

The seven-person accreditation panel met the requirements set out in Section 6 of the Accreditation Regulation and was comprised as follows:

  • three members of Council, two of whom were members of the Accreditation Committee, and at least one appointed member of Council
  • two College members who were not Council members
  • a roster member with experience as an educator in a faculty of education
  • a person nominated by the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University with expertise in Aboriginal teacher education programs

The panel member appointed with expertise in teaching Native Languages withdrew from the panel prior to the main campus site visit for personal reasons.

In making its recommendations, the panel reviewed the application for accreditation and other supplementary documentation provided by the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University. The accreditation panel conducted a site visit at the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ontario from March 18 – 23, 2012. An additional site visit occurred at the Orillia campus on March 7, 2012. During the site visits, the panel examined artifacts and program resources, toured the facilities where the programs are offered, and conducted interviews with faculty and stakeholders. Some individuals from northern communities participated in interviews by teleconference.

The College provided an opportunity for members of the public to comment on the quality of the programs under review. Open public forums were held at both campuses during the site visits. The public was notified of the opportunity to attend an open forum or provide a submission by poster advertisements distributed at both campus locations, notices on the College website and through push e-mail to College members.

Following the review, the accreditation panel compiled a draft report of its findings and recommendations for review by the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University. The final panel report submitted to the Accreditation Committee considers the comments provided by the faculty dean in response to the draft report.

The Accreditation Committee, by virtue of the authority granted under the Ontario College of Teachers Act, 1996, and Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs, set out to determine if the programs of professional education in the application submitted by the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University qualified for accreditation. The timeline for the committee’s decision was delayed due to the period of transition for the newly elected College Council and by honouring a request from the Dean for additional time to provide feedback to the draft report.

In making its decision, the Accreditation Committee considered the Accreditation Panel Final Report dated September 20, 2012, a response from the faculty dean to the panel’s draft report dated September 13, 2012, the Panel Chair’s presentation to the Accreditation Committee and the regulatory requirements of Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs.

Decision of the Accreditation Committee at its Meeting of October 2, 2012

Requirements and Findings

The reasons for the committee’s decision and the facts upon which it is based follow herein:

Requirement 1

The provider of the program is a permitted institution.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University is a permitted institution as defined in subsection 1.(1) of Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs.

According to Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs, a permitted institution includes a college, faculty or school of education in Ontario that is part of or affiliated with a university that is authorized to offer degrees under an Act of the Assembly.   

Lakehead University is established as a university under the Lakehead University Act, 1965. Under sections 4 and 5 of the Act, the University may establish faculties and schools, and may grant in all branches of learning any and all university degrees, diplomas and certificates.

The Faculty of Education, created on May 15, 1969, assumed the function of the previously established Lakehead Teachers’ College and thereby the operation of that College was discontinued.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 1 is fully satisfiedfor all programs reviewed.  

Requirement 2

The program has a clearly delineated conceptual framework.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the programs of professional education reviewed have a clearly delineated conceptual framework.

The conceptual framework provides the overall philosophy for all teacher education programs offered by the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University and is integrated into all aspects of these programs. The conceptual framework for the Honours Bachelor of Education Aboriginal Program (HBEd Aboriginal) and the Native Languages Teachers' Certification Program (NLTC) operates within the overall conceptual framework for the Faculty of Education. In relationship with the other teacher education programs, these programs have a special focus on Aboriginal teacher education.

The conceptual framework for the Faculty of Education is illustrated by a windmill whose tower represents the faculty, whose anchoring represents the collaborators, whose wind represents the program structure and whose blades represent the main competencies, aptitudes and attitudes that the Faculty of Education seeks to develop in teacher candidates. The six blades of the windmill draw upon key program goals from the mission statements of both the university and the Faculty of Education, representing knowledge of the Ontario Curriculum, reflective practice, the integration of theory and practice, professional and ethical standards, aboriginal perspectives and social justice/environmental responsibility.

Courses and course descriptions are aligned to the blades of the windmill in the conceptual framework. The conceptual framework informs all aspects of the program from course descriptions to hiring practices. Library resources that support the conceptual framework include notable collections on multiculturalism, Aboriginal education and social justice.

The emphasis on Aboriginal perspectives, which appears in both conceptual frameworks, is integral to all teacher education programs and to the university culture as a whole. The University Academic Plan for 2012 to 2015 requires that all students across all faculties take a course with an Aboriginal focus. Education candidates in the concurrent and consecutive programs take the compulsory course “Aboriginal Education” with a focus on policy and theory related to Aboriginal learners.

The conceptual framework of the HBEd Aboriginal Program and the NLTC Program is illustrated by a contemporary medicine wheel consisting of five spheres with the child/ student in the centre sphere and the outer spheres, representing the family, the community, the nation and society at large, positioned to surround, embrace and support the child/student. This conceptual framework is based on the Spheres of Influence for an Aboriginal Holistic Education (adapted from the Chiefs of Ontario, 2005) and stresses the need for teachers to engage and to educate the whole person – spiritually, emotionally, intellectually and physically. The conceptual framework of the HBEd Aboriginal and NLTC programs is supported by both the mission statement and the goals of the Lakehead University Strategic Plan 2010-2013. Its development was informed by documents such as the Ontario Curriculum documents for Native Languages and policies such as the Association of Canadian Deans of Education Accord on Indigenous Education and the Ministry of Education’s First Nation, Métis and Inuit Education Policy Framework.

The conceptual framework for the HBEd and NLTC programs is integrated into course content and the faculty asserts that teacher candidates who complete teacher education programs at Lakehead University are capable of engaging the five spheres of influence that surround and support the child. The five spheres represent the responsibility of the whole community for the child’s success in education.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 2 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 3

The program is consistent with and reflects

  1. the College’s “Standards of Practice for the Teaching Profession” and the “Ethical Standards for the Teaching Profession”,
  2. current research in teacher education, and
  3. the integration of theory and practice in teacher education.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the programs of professional education reviewed are consistent with and reflect the Ontario College of Teachers’ Ethical Standards for the Teaching Profession and the Standards of Practice for the Teaching Profession, current research in teacher education, and the integration of theory and practice in teacher education.

The Standards of Practice and Ethical Standards inform the conceptual framework and guide the faculty in the preparation of professional teachers. Course outlines in all programs routinely refer to the Standards of Practice and/or the Ethical Standards. The mandatory educational law course for the concurrent, consecutive and the HBEd Aboriginal program is particularly focused on the Standards of Practice and Ethical Standards. Teacher candidates in all programs identified knowledge of the Standards of Practice and Ethical Standards and some stated that the Standards are thoroughly infused into many courses. Modelling of professional behaviour in accordance with the College’s Standards is an important aspect of the practicum. For example, the Standards are integrated and embedded in actions, decisions and assignments associated with the practicum. The elements in both The Medicine Wheel and the conceptual framework of the HBEd Aboriginal and NLTC programs support the integration of the Standards of Practice and Ethical Standards into these programs.  For example, the Introduction to Teaching course in the Native Language Teacher’s Certification (NLTC) program includes a focus on teacher professionalism and the College’s Foundations of Professional Practice which contains the Ethical Standards and Standards of Practice.

Current research in teacher education informs the planning, organization and implementation of Lakehead’s teacher education programs. Researchers such as Piaget, Dewey, Gardner, Vygotsky, Scardamalia and Bereiter, Bandura and Bronfenbrenner are found in many course outlines and candidate assignments. Faculty have considered current research in teacher education in the design of courses and in the reflective nature of many candidate assignments. Courses such as Educational Psychology identify key approaches including constructivist, sociocultural and social cognitive traditions. The research of contemporary theorists such as Bishop, Battiste, St. Denis and Smith is central to the aboriginal education programs as well as to the mandatory course in aboriginal studies for all teacher candidates. In the NLTC program, emerging linguistic methodologies are working to revive the languages and cultures of the First Nations communities served.

A variety of different structural approaches are taken to the integration of theory and practice. The conceptual framework describes the ability to integrate theory in practice as a key competency for teacher candidates to acquire in all programs. Teacher candidates in the concurrent and consecutive programs are required to apply what they have learned in coursework and to actively reflect on the process of putting theory to work in teaching. Mandatory professional seminars take place on Fridays. The seminars, which include presentations from provincial organizations and the Ministry of Education, also provide an opportunity for candidates to reflect on professional context, the Standards, educational research and effective practices prior to and following their practicum placements. Faculty advisors assist teacher candidates to deconstruct teaching experiences, both through discussions of the practicum and through courses such as Essentials of Planning and Evaluation and Essentials of Classroom Management.

The HBEd Aboriginal program demonstrates the integration of theory and practice in a similar manner to the consecutive and concurrent programs in the courses. The Spheres of Influence for an Aboriginal Holistic Education that inform the format and design of the HBEd Aboriginal program express an expectation for teacher candidates to demonstrate a critical understanding of culturally appropriate and culturally based Aboriginal education. Candidates undertake a research-based study of First Nation, Métis and Inuit language, culture and traditions, and have meaningful opportunities to practice Indigenous pedagogies and ways of knowing. Some course outlines contain evidence of theory and practice expectations for teacher candidates taking courses in an online format.

Teacher candidates in the NLTC program engage in role-playing and in micro-teaching opportunities during the summer field experiences, both of which represent different approaches to the integration of theory and practice. The 20 days of practice teaching during fall/winter following Session One provide opportunities for candidates to practice and reflect on practice in the context of new theoretical learning, then incorporate new theoretical learning from Session Two into practice teaching in the second fall/winter and return to the faculty for additional theoretical and practical learning in Session Three.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 3 is fully satisfiedfor all programs reviewed.

Requirement 4

The program curriculum is current, references the Ontario curriculum, includes the application of current research in teacher education, and represents a wide knowledge base in the divisions and components of the program.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the programs reviewed are current, reference the Ontario curriculum, include the application of current research in teacher education, and represent a wide knowledge base in the divisions and components of the programs.

The curriculum for all programs is current. Course outlines reference up-to-date research and literature and cite many current educational researchers. For example, Educational Psychology, uses the key research of Dreikurs and Glasser, Black and William and Cooper. Lakehead faculty members partner with local school boards in research about single-gendered math instruction where improved results are studied for their cross-curricular effect. Other faculty members partner around best practices in delivery of the science curriculum. In doing work with local school boards and board consultants, faculty remain current in the realities of the classroom. These partnerships inform the learning of teacher candidates at the faculty.  

The Ontario curriculum documents are foundational to the program content of all programs. Course outlines cite specific curriculum documents and teacher candidates study the curriculum documents. Faculty relate the material discussed in classes to the Ontario curriculum.  

The application of current research in teacher education is seen throughout the curriculum in all teacher education programs at Lakehead. Thunder Bay school board partners provided details on faculty/school board partnerships involving Math and Science research projects. Recommendations from these projects are informing practice across Ontario and Canada. Readings from major theorists such as Bishop, Battiste, Donald, St. Denis, Smith and MacDonald are present throughout the HBEd Aboriginal program and also in the required course on Aboriginal Education as well as in an elective course on Drama in Education. The focus on anti-oppressive, decolonizing, experiential education reflects current research on effective teacher education approaches for aboriginal students. Additionally, a significant focus on Primary and Junior Math learning and instruction is evident. Policy documents which are rich in research and inform all aspects of education are referenced in the curriculum, including Acting Today, Shaping Tomorrow: A Policy Framework for Environmental Education in Ontario schools; and Teaching and Learning Mathematics: the Report of the Expert Panel. The use of portfolio assessments is common in all programs and resonates with current research and Ministry policy. Further examples confirming the application of research in teacher education include a video produced by teacher candidates dealing with the issue of boys’ literacy, and candidate research papers critically analyzing recent publications on issues of science and society. 

The curriculum in all programs represents a wide knowledge base in the divisions and components of the program. All teacher candidates in the consecutive and concurrent programs take additional divisionally-related literacy credits such as Early Literacy, Balanced Literacy and Literacy and Learning in the I/S Curriculum. I/S candidates take an additional credit in Guiding Student Choices. Consecutive and concurrent candidates take a mandatory course in Aboriginal Education. Consecutive, concurrent and HBEd Aboriginal candidates take a course in Teaching Exceptional Students. HBEd Aboriginal candidates also take courses in Early Reading and an additional course in Mathematics. The program curriculum for the NLTC requires involvement with multiple languages and dialects.

Libraries at both campuses have extensive holdings on education that contribute to a wide knowledge base, including resources for research, for lesson planning and for aboriginal education.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 4 is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 5

The course content of the program includes theory, method and foundation courses and appropriate provision for the application of theory in practice.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the course content for the consecutive, concurrent and NLTC programs includes theory, method and foundation courses and makes appropriate provision for the application of theory in practice.  The course content for the HBEd Aboriginal program includes theory and foundation courses. Additional evidence is required to verify the appropriate provision for the application of theory in practice in the HBEd Aboriginal program.  

Most course outlines for online delivery in the HBEd Aboriginal program were not available, and it was not possible to assume that the course outlines for use in an online format would be the same as those course outlines in a face-to-face format, as assignments, and opportunities to interact with colleagues to develop shared learning and understanding could require different strategies. In addition, most of the method courses in the HBEd Aboriginal program have not yet been delivered. The committee was unable to verify that theory in practice was consistently a part of the method courses in the HBEd Aboriginal program.

Compulsory theory courses for all P/J, J/I and I/S teacher candidates in the consecutive, concurrent and HBEd Aboriginal programs include two division specific theory courses: Essentials of Planning and Evaluation and Essentials of Classroom Management. The NLTC program includes the compulsory theory course: Development of the Child.

The consecutive and concurrent teacher education programs have compulsory method courses related to the Ontario curricular subjects taught in the divisions. Compulsory foundation courses are present for all areas of study in the consecutive and concurrent programs and include Aboriginal Education, Educational Law, Educational Psychology, Foundations and Issues in Education and Teaching Exceptional Students.

Required method courses planned for the HBEd Aboriginal are identical to the required methods courses in the consecutive and concurrent P/J and include Early Reading, Language Arts, Teaching Early Literacy, Mathematics, Health and Physical Education, Music, Visual Arts, Science and Technology and Social Studies.

Most teacher candidates in the HBEd Aboriginal program have not yet completed methods courses. Many of the method courses that are offered in a face-to-face format in other programs will be offered in a distance education format in the HBEd Aboriginal program. This includes Visual Arts, Music, Physical and Health Education, and Mathematics. Course outlines reflecting an online delivery format are not yet available.

Foundations courses in the HBEd Aboriginal program are similar to those in the consecutive and concurrent P/J programs and include Educational Law, Educational Psychology and Teaching Exceptional Students. Teacher candidates in the program study the Education Act, Safe Schools Act and the Indian Act.

Course content for the NLTC program includes both foundation and method courses. Method courses include Oral Algonquian Structure Part One through to Part Three, Native as a Second Language,  Methods Part One through to Part Three and Student Teaching. Faculty have a strong understanding of what is happening in aboriginal communities and are able to relate this understanding to their method courses. Compulsory foundations courses include Introduction to Teaching and Current Issues in Native Language Education.

Teacher candidates in the concurrent and consecutive programs undertake projects and assignments to both apply theory in practice and to reflect on their experience. Connecting theory in practice is a focus of many courses. For example, the mandatory Educational Psychology course has a number of assignments that require candidates to apply theoretical learning in practice, including developing behavioural strategies, and knowing and appreciating the diverse backgrounds and needs of Ontario learners. As well, faculty members who advise teacher candidates during the practicum also serve as instructors for the theory courses, maximizing the opportunity for the provision of theory in practice.

The course content in the HBEd Aboriginal program is planned to include the application of theory in practice. The course outline for the online Educational Psychology provides assignments in which candidates must summarize research and integrate it with their lived experience.  However, teacher candidates in this program have not yet had the opportunity to complete all theory, method and foundation courses, and most course outlines for online delivery in the program were not available.

The NLTC courses provide opportunities for the application of theory in practice. As part of their course work during the summer sessions, teacher candidates teach different age groups in on-campus simulated practica, and receive immediate feedback and assistance from faculty members on their progress in putting theory into practice. Teacher candidates have opportunities to apply the theory they have learned to the lessons they teach during these simulated lessons and in winter practicum placements.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 5 is fully satisfied for the consecutive, concurrent and NLTC programs and substantially satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal program.

Reasons for Conclusion

Teacher candidates in the HBEd Aboriginal program have not yet completed all of the theory, method and foundation courses that comprise the program of professional education. A review of the course descriptions suggests the program content is likely to include theory, methods and foundations courses and the available course outlines make provision for theory in practice.

The committee is unable to fully confirm the presence of theory in practice as all course outlines for distance delivery are not presently available for review. Most candidates have not yet taken these courses.  Other supporting interview evidence was not available.  In the absence of this information, the committee is unable to verify that this aspect of the requirement is fully satisfied.

The Committee accepts that the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University intends to ensure that the HBEd Aboriginal program satisfies Requirement 5.

Fully satisfying Requirement 5 for the HBEd Aboriginal program is contingent upon the Dean of the Faculty of Education submitting evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the theory, methods and foundations courses offered by distance education in the program include appropriate provision for the application of theory in practice. For example, the Dean might provide evidence such as:

  • course outlines for theory, method and foundation courses offered by distance in the HBEd Aboriginal program that demonstrate an appropriate provision for the application of theory in practice
  • documentation such as teacher candidate assignments or projects related to the method and foundation courses offered by distance education in the HBEd Aboriginal program that demonstrate appropriate provision for the application of theory in practice
  • outcomes of program reviews and/or surveys of teacher candidates/ graduates/faculty in the program demonstrating appropriate provision for the application of theory in practice within method and foundation courses offered by distance education.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 5 will be fully satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal program.

Requirement 6

The program’s format and structure are appropriate for the course content.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the format and structure are appropriate for the course content for the consecutive and concurrent programs, and the NLTC program.  The HBEd Aboriginal program is two years from having a graduating class. Additional evidence is required to verify that the format and structure are appropriate for the course content.

The Lakehead University Faculty of Education structures their teacher education programs in a variety of formats, modes and locations including:

  • consecutive, concurrent “Regular” delivery – 5.5 full-time course equivalents taken over two 9-week semesters on campus, and followed by a 25 day practicum in each semester; the Orillia P/J and the Thunder Bay J/I and I/S programs follow this format  
  • Professional Program On-campus (PPOD) delivery - 5.5 full-time course equivalents taken over two 9-week semesters on campus, and followed by a 25 day practicum in each semester; candidates spend one day each week teaching and learning in local schools;
  • Revised Integrated Teacher Education (RITE), with similar credit weights and course requirements, but a condensed schedule delivery;
  • Honours Bachelor of Education Aboriginal P/J (HBEd Aboriginal) full-time delivery format and on campus
  • Honours Bachelor of Education Aboriginal P/J (HBEd Aboriginal) part-time delivery format, with some on campus, some community-based and some distance delivery, and
  • Native Language Teacher’s Certification (NLTC), delivered in multi-session format.

All programs are appropriately structured to address distinctly different needs of teacher candidates and different aspects of the community that the programs and graduates will subsequently serve. Although some differences in course materials between programs are noted, especially to support a focus on aboriginal learners, differences in the programs of professional education occur primarily in scheduling.

The single-degree HBEd Aboriginal program was initially accredited with a four year, full-time format. The faculty now operates the program in two formats, a full-time format which includes some community-based, faculty supported learning, and a part-time format which has both face-to-face and distance delivery courses and some community-based, faculty supported learning.

The first cohort of teacher candidates enrolled in the HBEd Aboriginal program began the part-time community based format in the summer of 2008 and is expected to graduate in 2014. As a result, there are compulsory method and foundation courses that have not yet been offered. Teacher candidates have not yet begun their practicum placements.  In addition, the program format for part-time candidates in the HBEd Aboriginal program includes approximately 50% of the course work delivered face-to-face, 40% delivered by distance, and 10% delivered in a community-based environment. Course outlines differentiated for an online modality were not available for many courses.  

The full-time, four year format did not have a cohort enrolled until 2009 meaning there are neither graduates, nor are there candidates who have taken all method and foundation courses.

The HBEd Aboriginal program has the same course requirements and the same requirements for number of practicum days, as the Regular, PPOD and RITE consecutive and concurrent schedules.

The practicum for the part-time format of the HBEd program is planned for 50 days, in two 25 day blocks that occur at the end of the course work in a continuous period.  The committee was unable to consider evidence from alumni, faculty advisors or host school personnel to verify the appropriateness of this unique delivery model for the practica, as a graduating class is not expected until 2014.

The multi-session consecutive NLTC program prepares teacher candidates to teach native languages across all divisions. Graduates are not able to teach other general education courses (for example, Language Arts or Health and Physical Education) without either a Temporary Letter of Approval or taking a pre-service or Additional Basic Qualification to teach in one or more divisions.

Multi-session program candidates are eligible for a transitional certificate of qualification and registration after the first session of the program is successfully completed. The first session of the NLTC program consists of nine post-secondary credits in a method course for teaching native languages and three credits in an educational foundations course.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 6 is fully satisfiedfor the consecutive and concurrent programs and the multi-session NLTC program, including complying with the definition of a multi-session program as defined in the Teachers’ Qualifications Regulation.

The Accreditation Committee finds that Requirement 6 is substantially satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal program.

Reasons for Conclusion

The HBEd Aboriginal program is still within its initial implementation period and has not had a graduating class. Evidence from alumni, teacher candidates, associate teachers, or faculty advisors was not available to verify the appropriateness of the program’s unique format and structure.

Course outlines have not yet been consistently differentiated to reflect the specific modes of delivery, face-to-face or distance.  

The HBEd Aboriginal program has two different practicum delivery models: one involves a traditional model of two semesters, each with nine weeks of work at the faculty of education followed by five weeks of practicum experience. This represents the delivery model that is used in the consecutive and concurrent programs. There is evidence of a second practicum structure for the part-time format whereby candidates complete all practicum requirements at the conclusion of all program course work. Additional information regarding the rationale and effectiveness for this unique format is required. Particularly, information is required to demonstrate that this new format supports engagement with reflection and further learning, that there is an opportunity to connect theory and practice, and that there is sufficient time and learning opportunity for teacher candidates to improve their practice in practicum placements.

The Committee accepts that the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University intends to ensure that the HBEd Aboriginal program satisfies Requirement 6.

Fully satisfying Requirement 6 for the HBEd Aboriginal program  is contingent upon the Dean of the Faculty of Education submitting evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee of the appropriateness of the part-time format and structure of the HBEd Aboriginal program.  

To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide in relation to the HBEd Aboriginal program, for example:

  • information demonstrating that the courses, particularly those delivered by distance, support appropriate teacher candidate learning and achievement of the course and/or program goals, such as identifying how theory in practice is supported in course work, readings and other resources, teaching strategies and assignments
  • sample timetables for  teacher candidates with corresponding course outlines reflecting the delivery mode to verify that the format is appropriate for the delivery mode, particularly that theory in practice is supported in courses delivered by distance
  • summaries of data from program evaluation, teacher candidate and associate teacher surveys, research or other methods of the effectiveness of the practica format, in cases where  all of the practica occurs at the end of the program, is appropriate to support theory in practice and achievement of teacher candidates
  • summaries of data from teacher candidates, such as survey results, and data from program partners such as employers, indicating their level of satisfaction and comments on the effectiveness of the fully implemented program.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 6 will be fully satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal program.

Requirement 7

Students are assessed and informed of their progress on an ongoing basis throughout the program.

Findings

The evidence indicates that teacher candidates are assessed and informed of their progress on an ongoing basis throughout the consecutive, concurrent and NLTC programs, and to this point in the HBEd Aboriginal program. Additional evidence is required to verify assessment practices throughout the HBEd Aboriginal program.

In the consecutive and concurrent programs, course outlines contain both a variety of types and number of assessments such as journals, lesson plans and presentations. Faculty use a standardized rubric in all courses which is then adjusted to suit the particular assignment or course expectation. Teacher candidates begin receiving feedback during the second or third week of classes and this continues weekly for the rest of the course.

 Practicum placement assessments require that teacher candidates and associate teachers assess progress and share findings with each other and the faculty advisor. Teacher candidates receive written and oral feedback on a continual basis during the practicum. There is a three week formative progress report which faculty advisors use to provide support to candidates in addition to weekly communication via WebCT, an online learning management system.  

Teacher candidates in the NLTC are generally satisfied with the frequency and regularity of feedback regarding their progress, in courses and in practicum placements. HBEd Aboriginal candidates express general satisfaction with the frequency and regularity of feedback in the courses they have taken. Most method and foundation courses, as well as the practicum, have yet to be delivered.

The delivery of the summer courses in the NLTC program is intensive and condensed. Instructors make themselves readily available to provide support and feedback.  During their field experiences, feedback is provided using a practice teaching report as a basis for discussion. Other feedback comes from workshops, mandatory attendance at assemblies and during practice teaching.

The assessment practices of the HBEd Aboriginal program are planned to be similar to the consecutive and concurrent programs of professional education. Assessment of course work will employ the Lakehead faculty standardized assessment rubric, and practicum evaluation processes will be similarly structured.

Teacher candidates in the HBEd Aboriginal program have not completed most of the course work that comprises the program of professional education and have not completed any of the required practicum placements. As a result, further evidence is required to verify that teacher candidates in the HBEd Aboriginal program are informed of their progress in course work and practica on an ongoing basis throughout the program.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 7 is fully satisfiedfor the consecutive, concurrent and NLTC program and substantially satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal program.

Reasons for Conclusion

Teacher candidates in the HBEd Aboriginal program have not completed most of the course work that comprises the program of professional education and have not completed any practicum placements. As such, the panel did not receive sufficient information in the application or during the review process to verify that teacher candidates in the HBEd Aboriginal program are informed of their progress in course work and practica on an ongoing basis throughout the program

The Committee accepts that the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University intends to ensure that the HBEd Aboriginal program satisfies Requirement 7.

Fully satisfying Requirement 7 for the HBEd Aboriginal program is contingent upon the Dean of the Faculty of Education submitting evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the teacher candidates in the HBEd Aboriginal program are assessed and informed of their progress on an ongoing basis throughout the program.

To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide in relation to the HBEd Aboriginal program, for example:

  • published policies related to the assessment and evaluation of course work and practica, such as a Practica Handbooks for the program
  • artifacts to verify that policies are implemented as planned, such as teacher candidate assignments from the method and foundation courses after they are taught demonstrating regular assessment
  • course evaluations and/or surveys of alumni who have completed the program indicating the ongoing nature in which candidates are informed of their progress throughout the program course work and practica
  • practicum reports from faculty advisors and associate teachers that are dated, indicating multiple opportunities for assessment of candidates in the program.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 7 will be fully satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal program.

Requirement 8

The program includes a practicum that satisfies the requirements set out in subparagraph 2v of subsection 1(2) and subsection 9(2).

Subparagraph 2v of subsection 1(2) sets out that “…a program of professional education … includes … a minimum of 40 days of practical experience in schools or in other situations approved by the College for observation and practice teaching.”

Subsection 9. (2) sets out that the requirements for the practicum portion of the programs are as follows:

  1. The practicum must include observation and practice teaching in an instructional setting in schools or other situations that use the Ontario curriculum or in situations approved by the College.
  2. Revoked - see subparagraph 2v of subsection 1(2)
  3. The practicum enables every student to participate in settings related to each division and at least one of the subject areas of the program that are relevant to the student.
  4. An experienced teacher supervises the students and assesses their practicum.
  5. A faculty member is appointed as an advisor for each student.

Findings

The evidence indicates that all required components for the practicum are addressed in the consecutive and concurrent program. Teacher candidates in the HBEd Aboriginal program have not yet completed any of their practicum placements. Substantiating information about the practicum experience from alumni, teacher candidates, associate teachers, school board personnel, and faculty advisors was not available for the HBEd Aboriginal program. Additional evidence is required to verify that the HBEd Aboriginal program addresses all practicum requirements. There are challenges consistently satisfying some of the practicum requirements in the NLTC program. Further evidence is required to verify that the NLTC program appoints a faculty member as an advisor for each teacher candidate, that an experienced teacher supervises the teacher candidates during all practicum placements, and that the practicum enables teacher candidates to participate in each division (P/J/I/S).

A minimum of 40 days of practical experience in schools or in other situations approved by the College for observation and practice teaching occurs for teacher candidates in the consecutive, concurrent and NLTC programs. The HBEd Aboriginal program is planned to provide a minimum of 40 days of appropriate practical experience, however implementation of this practice could not be verified as no candidates have yet participated in the practicum.

The Professional Year Reference Guide stipulates that all teacher candidates in the consecutive and concurrent programs complete the Faculty of Education’s required 50 days of successful student teaching as part of the academic requirements for the Bachelor of Education Program at Lakehead University. The Practicum Schedules for 2011/2012 confirm that the number of practicum placement days totals 50.

The HBEd Aboriginal P/J program is planned to include a minimum of 40 days of practice teaching in two placements of 25 days each, with time completing professional course work before the first placement and again prior to the second placement. However, in the proposed practicum timetable for part-time teacher candidates, the practicum placement is planned to occur as two continuous 25 day placements at the end of all course work, in 2014. If the practicum is implemented as per either plan it will satisfy the practicum requirement of a minimum of 40 days of practical experience. As the program does not yet have candidates who have completed the practicum, the committee was unable to consider evidence from alumni, faculty advisors or host school personnel to verify that candidates undertake a minimum of 40 days of practical experience in schools or in other situations approved by the College for observation and practice teaching.  As yet, the HBEd Aboriginal program does not have a published practicum handbook which could also provide confirming evidence.

Teacher candidates in the NLTC program complete two practicum sessions of 20 days each, totalling 40 days of teaching experience. 

For teacher candidates in the consecutive and concurrent programs, the practicum includes observation and practice teaching in an instructional setting in schools or other situations that use the Ontario curriculum. Practica are arranged only with schools in the 53 school boards with which Lakehead has established partnerships and with First Nations schools which follow the Ontario curriculum. Observation and practice teaching in an instructional setting in schools or other situations that use the Ontario curriculum or in situations approved by the College is planned for the HBEd Aboriginal program. As there are no candidates who have yet been placed in a practicum, no graduates who have completed a practicum, nor are there associate teachers or faculty advisors who are experienced in the practicum placements for this program, the committee was unable to consider evidence to verify that the practicum has been implemented as planned.  Further evidence is required for the committee to verify that observation and practice teaching takes place in an instructional setting in schools or other situations that use the Ontario curriculum or in situations approved by the College.

Practicum placements in the NLTC program take place in public school settings where the Ontario Curriculum is used and in First Nations schools that utilize Ministry documents and the Ontario Curriculum.

Practicum placements for teacher candidates in the consecutive and concurrent programs enable every student to participate in settings related to each division and at least one of the subject areas of the program that are relevant to the student. For the consecutive and concurrent programs, the Professional Year Reference Guide for Associate Teachers indicates that the 50-day practicum is divided into two placement blocks and that the two placements are at different divisional levels.

If the practica for the HBEd Aboriginal program is implemented as proposed it is likely to satisfy the requirement of enabling teacher candidates to participate in practicum placements in both the Primary and Junior divisions. However, further evidence is required for the committee to verify that the practicum has been implemented as planned so that every candidate is able to participate in settings related to the Primary and Junior divisions.

The NLTC program is intended to prepare graduates for certification to teach the subject of Native Languages to students in all four divisions (Primary, Junior, Intermediate, Senior). The evidence indicates that although the practicum for NLTC teacher candidates enables them to teach Native Languages, the settings for the practicum are not relevant to all divisions in which they may practice. Over four weeks in each summer of the multi-session program, teacher candidates instruct a minimum of three lessons to various age levels: 5-6, 7-8, 8-11, and 12-16. This teaching experience does not meet the regulatory requirements to be recognized as a formal practicum. The committee could not confirm that all teacher candidates receive experience in all divisions, as required, during the formal practicum placements in the fall/winter.

An experienced teacher supervises and assesses the practicum of teacher candidates in the consecutive and concurrent programs. All associate teachers are members in good standing of the Ontario College of Teachers and have been recommended by principals and/or superintendents.

If the practica in the HBEd Aboriginal program is implemented as proposed, it is likely to satisfy the requirement that an experienced teacher supervises the candidates and assesses the practicum. However, further evidence is required for the committee to verify that the practicum has been implemented as planned so that an experienced teacher supervises every candidate and assesses their practicum.

The committee was unable to confirm that all teacher candidates in the NLTC program are supervised by experienced associate teachers during their practicum placements. The Coordinator of Aboriginal Programs provided evidence that the summer classes for this program are taught by associate teachers who assess the teaching of the teacher candidates during field experiences that occur during the summer sessions. However, this teaching experience does not meet the regulatory criteria to be recognized as a formal practicum. Formal practicum placements take place during the fall/winter following the first and second summer sessions of this multi-session program. Teacher candidates in the NLTC program are required to arrange their own practicum placements in their communities, and to find their own associate teachers. Teacher candidates in NLTC who are participating in their second practicum placement have, in all cases, received a Transitional Certificate of Qualification and are certified teachers during the second practicum placement. The principal generally supervises the teacher candidate and completes the assessment form. Because of this, the first practicum placement is particularly important, as it is the only time in which an associate teacher is guaranteed to be present with the teacher candidate while the teacher candidate is teaching. Alumni confirmed that in some cases their first practicum experience has consisted of replacing a Native Language teacher in the classroom, so that no associate teacher is present with the teacher candidate during the practicum. Further evidence is required for the committee to verify that the faculty ensures that all teacher candidates in the NLTC programs are supervised and assessed by an Ontario certified teacher during all formal practica. 

A faculty member is appointed as an advisor for each teacher candidate in the consecutive and concurrent programs.  The role of the faculty advisor involves mentorship of teacher candidates and liaison with the schools and associate teachers. If a practicum placement is going well, faculty advisors do not usually come into the school to see the teacher candidates personally. However, the faculty advisor is immediately involved with any teacher candidates who are experiencing difficulty in their placements. Teacher candidates who experience practicum difficulty in the consecutive and concurrent programs are required to be placed in close proximity to the campus during their next practicum assignment, so that frequent face-to-face visits by the faculty advisor can occur.

If the practica in the HBEd Aboriginal program is implemented as proposed, it is likely to satisfy the requirement that a faculty member is appointed as an advisor for each student. However, further evidence is required for the committee to verify that the practicum has been implemented as planned so that a faculty member is appointed as an advisor for each teacher candidate in the HBEd Aboriginal program.

A faculty member is appointed as a faculty advisor for each teacher candidate in the NLTC program.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 8 is fully satisfied for the consecutive and concurrent programs and substantially satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal and Native Language Teacher’s Certification programs.

Reasons for Conclusion

The Committee accepts that the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University intends to ensure that Requirement 8 is fully satisfied for all programs under review.

In the case of the HBEd Aboriginal program, teacher candidates have not yet completed any of their practicum placements. Substantiating information from alumni, teacher candidates, associate teachers, school board personnel, and faculty advisors is not available to the committee to determine that the practicum includes a minimum of 40 days of practical experience that includes observation and practice teaching in instructional settings in schools that use the Ontario curriculum, or in situations approved by the College. Substantiating evidence is not available to the committee to determine that the practicum enables each teacher candidate to participate in settings related to each division and at least one of the subject areas in the program relevant to the candidate. Evidence cannot presently confirm that an experienced teacher supervises and assesses the practicum, and that a faculty member is appointed as an advisor for each teacher candidate.

Fully satisfying Requirement 8 for the HBEd Aboriginal program is contingent upon the Dean of the Faculty of Education submitting evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the practicum, as implemented, includes all requirements. For example, the Dean might provide in relation to the HBEd Aboriginal program:

  • published policies describing the criteria for practicum placements, such as a Practica Handbook for the program and/or other forms of communication with teacher candidates and practicum partners outlining criteria
  • program artifacts to verify that practicum experiences are implemented as proposed for each teacher candidate, such as a summary chart or copies of completed practica assessment forms identifying the length of the experience, the divisions and subject areas observed and/or taught, the name of the placement school, the initials of the faculty advisor, and the OCT registration number for the person responsible for supervising and assessing each practica experience
  • the names of the placement schools, or other approved settings, with information to verify whether the setting is a school or an alternative placement that uses the Ontario curriculum
  • summary of survey information or other feedback forms from individuals involved in implementation of the practica experience, such as alumni, teacher candidates, associate teachers, school board personnel and faculty advisors, to verify that the required components were implemented as proposed
  • a description of the quality assurance processes in place for tracking future teacher candidate placements and verifying that the practica experience is completed as proposed.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 8 will be fully satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal program.

Some, but not all, NLTC teacher candidates are supervised and assessed by an experienced Ontario certified teacher. It is not always possible for candidates to have a placement in each division, as many schools on reserves and in remote locations only offer Kindergarten to Grade 8 programming.

Fully satisfying Requirement 8 for the NLTC program is contingent upon the Dean of the Faculty of Education submitting evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that all teacher candidates are supervised and assessed by an experienced Ontario certified teacher, and that the practicum enables every teacher candidate to participate in relevant settings for preparation as a Native Languages teacher in all four divisions.For example, the Dean might provide in relation to the NLTC program:

  • published policies describing criteria for practicum placements that reflect the requirements noted, such as a Practica Handbook for the program and/or other forms of communication with teacher candidates and practicum partners outlining criteria
  • program artifacts to verify that practicum experiences for the areas of concern reflect the regulatory standard, such as a summary chart or copies of completed practica assessment forms identifying the length of the experience, the divisions and subject areas observed and/or taught, the initials and frequency and type of participation of the faculty advisor, and the OCT registration number for the person responsible for supervising and assessing each practica experience; for candidates teaching on a transitional certification of qualification, the OCT certified teacher supervising and assessing the practica may be the school administrator or an itinerant teacher or consultant
  • a plan that acknowledges and addresses the faculty’s intention to supplement the practicum experience to enable NLTC teacher candidates to participate, where feasible, in a practicum setting related to teaching Native Languages in all of the divisions that certified candidates can teach Native Languages (Primary, Junior, Intermediate, Senior); this may include supplementing the summer teaching experience
  • a description of the quality assurances mechanisms employed by the faculty to track and verify that practicum experiences for NLTC candidates take place across all four divisions and under the supervision of an OCT certified teacher.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 8 will be fully satisfied for the multi-session Native Languages program.

Requirement 9

Successful completion of the practicum is a requirement for successful completion of the program.

Findings

The evidence indicates that successful completion of the practicum is required for successful completion of the programs reviewed.

The practicum handbook and the university calendar indicate that teacher candidates in all programs must successfully complete the practicum in order to successfully complete the program. Teacher candidates in all programs are allowed one additional practicum placement in order to be successful in completing the requirement. Teacher candidates in the consecutive and concurrent programs who are having difficulty and are required to redo a practicum placement, must complete this practicum placement in close proximity to the faculty advisor, so that there can be increased supervision and assistance. Candidates are not reported to the Ontario College of Teachers until they have successfully completed the practicum.

The HBEd Aboriginal program adheres to the same policy as the other Lakehead programs with regard to successful completion of the practicum.

For candidates in the NLTC program, the transitional certificate is not converted to a Certificate of Qualification and Registration unless the practicum has been successfully completed.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 9is fully satisfied for all programs reviewed.

Requirement 10

The teaching method courses in the program are appropriate in relation to the divisions to which they relate.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the teaching method courses in the NLTC program are appropriate in relation to the divisions to which they relate. Additional evidence is required to fully substantiate that the teaching method courses in the consecutive and concurrent programs, and in the HBEd Aboriginal program, are appropriate to the divisions to which they relate.

Most teaching method courses in the consecutive and concurrent programs are divisionally appropriate. Teaching method courses for the Primary/Junior consecutive and concurrent programs include Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Technology, Social Studies, Music, Health and Physical Education, and Visual Arts. Teaching method courses for the Junior/Intermediate consecutive and concurrent programs include Language Arts, Math, Social Studies, Science and Technology, Music, Art, and Health and Physical Education. However, not all strands of the The Arts are addressed in the methods courses for the Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate areas of study in those programs. 

Dance, a required subject area in P/J method courses, is minimally included in the Health and Physical Education course. Drama could not be found in any required method course. The faculty acknowledged the absence of The Arts: Dance and Drama from the existing arts-focused methods courses. A new mandatory .25 course focused on methods in The Arts: Dance and Drama in the Primary and Junior, and Junior and Intermediate divisions, will be introduced in 2013/2014. There are plans to incorporate this by adjusting two other courses, with no proposed loss of required curriculum through the adjustment. Additional evidence is required to verify that Drama and Dance are appropriately included in the teaching method courses.

The Intermediate/Senior programs, consecutive and concurrent, include two core methods courses, Literacy and Learning in the I/S Curriculum, and Guiding Student Choices. There are also methods courses for each of the teacher candidate’s two teachable subjects. Teachable subject areas include History, Social Sciences – General, Mathematics, Health and Physical Education, Biology, Chemistry, General Science, Geography, Physics, English, French as a Second Language, Native Studies, Environmental Science/Environmental Studies, Native Languages and Tutorial, Business Studies- Accounting, Computer Studies, Music (Instrumental), Music (Vocal), and Visual Arts. Course outlines indicate that curriculum from Grades 7 – 12 are included in the material covered.

The teaching method courses for the Primary/Junior divisions in the HBEd Aboriginal program include Language Arts, Math, Science and Technology, Social Studies, Music, Physical and Health Education and Visual Arts. However, not all strands of the The Arts are addressed in the methods courses for the Primary/Junior areas of study in the program. 

Dance, a required subject area in P/J method courses, is minimally included in the Health and Physical Education course. Drama could not be found in any required method course. The faculty acknowledged the absence of The Arts: Dance and Drama from the existing arts-focused methods courses. A new mandatory .25 course focused on methods in The Arts: Dance and Drama in the Primary and Junior, and Junior and Intermediate divisions, will be introduced in 2013/2014. There are plans to incorporate this by adjusting two other courses, with no proposed loss of required curriculum through the adjustment. Candidates in the HBEd Aboriginal program have not yet completed the methods courses. Method course outlines differentiated for each mode of delivery have not yet been completed.  

In the NLTC program, teaching methods are emphasized in the three Native Language as a Second Language courses, one of which is taken in each summer session. Ontario Ministry of Education Native Languages curriculum documents Grades 1-8, 9-10 and 11-12 are found as required texts in Part 1 of the NASL methods courses, and are referenced for unit planning in Part 3. These courses focus on the principles of second language acquisition. The cultural elements embedded in all NLTC methods courses also address language fluency and instruction.

Additional teaching methods are addressed through field experiences which include observation of experienced teachers and preparing lessons for and teaching all ages (6-8), (9-10), (11-12), (13-16) in the courses taken each summer of the multi-session program. These method courses provide opportunities for teacher candidates to gain experience with multiple age groups throughout the divisions.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 10 is fully satisfied for the NLTC program and substantially satisfied for the concurrent, consecutive and HBEd Aboriginal programs reviewed.

Reasons for Conclusion                                                                     

The Accreditation Committee accepts that the Faculty of Education, Lakehead University, intends to ensure that the teaching method courses in all programs are appropriate in relation to the divisions to which they relate.

The committee was unable to verify evidence that all strands of the The Arts are addressed in the methods courses for the Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate areas of study in the consecutive and concurrent programs, and in the HBEd Aboriginal program.  The Accreditation Committee notes that the Dean of the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University has proposed a plan for including Drama and Dance in the consecutive and concurrent programs, and in the HBEd Aboriginal program. In addition, the committee received evidence that the HBEd Aboriginal program will deliver some teaching method courses in an online format. Modification for online delivery has not yet been completed. Additional evidence is required to confirm the appropriateness of the content and pedagogy for these method courses delivered by distance education. 

Fully satisfying Requirement 10 for the consecutive and concurrent program is contingent upon the Dean of the Faculty of Education submitting evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the teaching method courses for the Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate areas of study in the consecutive and concurrent programs include the appropriate Drama and Dance strands of the Ontario Curriculum - The Arts. To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide in relation to the consecutive and concurrent programs, for example:

  • methods course outlines for the Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate areas of study in the explicitly referencing content that includes division-appropriate pedagogy, resources and instruction for the Drama and Dance components of the Ontario Curriculum – The Arts
  • artifacts verifying that the content is addressed, such as required teacher candidate assignments related to Drama and Dance methods or relevant summaries of outcomes of course evaluations and/or program reviews

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision.  Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 10 will be fully satisfied for the consecutive and concurrent programs.

Fully satisfying Requirement 10 for the HBEd Aboriginal program is contingent upon the Dean of the Faculty of Education submitting evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the teaching method courses in the program are appropriate in content and appropriately differentiated in mode of delivery for preparation to teach the Primary/Junior divisions.

To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide in relation to the HBEd Aboriginal program, for example:

  • differentiated course outlines for the HBEd Aboriginal program demonstrating the appropriateness of the teaching methods courses for all modes of delivery in which the program is offered, including programs offered by distance
  • methods course outlines from the HBEd Aboriginal program explicitly referencing content that includes division-appropriate pedagogy, resources and instruction for the Drama and Dance components of the Ontario Curriculum – The Arts
  • artifacts to verify that the content is addressed, such as teacher candidate assignments related to required Drama and Dance methods or relevant summaries of outcomes of course evaluations and/or program reviews
  • documentation, such as letters or testimonials, from alumni, associate teachers, teacher candidates and/or faculty advisors confirming that the methods courses were divisionally appropriate and that the mode of delivery was appropriate for the material being studied.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision.  Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 10 will be fully satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal program.

Requirement 11

The teaching theory and foundation courses in the program include courses on human development and learning and on legislation and government policies relating to education.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the teaching theory and foundation courses in the consecutive, concurrent and HBEd Aboriginal programs include courses on human development and learning, and on legislation and government policies relating to education. Teaching theory and foundation courses in the NLTC program are present; additional evidence of a course or a particular focus on legislation and government policies relating to education is required.

The consecutive and concurrent programs include two core courses, Educational Psychology and Teaching Exceptional Students, that specifically address child growth and development, the learning process, and their implications for the work of the classroom teacher. Two other core courses, Educational Law and Foundations, and Issues in Education, provide teacher candidates with information about policies and legislation such as the Education Act, Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Duty to Report, Safe Schools Act, and Ontario Human Rights Legislation.

The HBEd Aboriginal program includes the courses in Education Psychology, Teaching Exceptional Students and Educational Law in the third year of the program. These courses have the same course numbers and names as in the consecutive and concurrent programs.

The NLTC program includes educational psychology through the use of a maturation chart and a course regarding the development of children (Development of the Child). However, legislation and government policies relating to education were not evident in course descriptions or embedded significantly as objectives in required courses in the NLTC program. For example, no course objectives specifically named knowledge of or exposure to the Ontario Education Act, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, OSR guidelines, Safe Schools, Growing Success, Equity or Inclusive Education in Ontario Schools, the Ontario First Nation, Métis, and Inuit Policy Framework or the Indian Act.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 11 is fully satisfiedfor the consecutive, concurrent and the HBEd Aboriginal programs and substantially satisfiedfor the NLTC program.

Reasons for Conclusion

The Accreditation Committee accepts that the Faculty of Education, Lakehead University intends to ensure that the NLTC program will satisfy Requirement 11. However, legislation and government policies relating to education were not evident in course descriptions or embedded significantly as objectives in required courses in the NLTC program. For example, no course objectives specifically named knowledge of or exposure to the Ontario Education Act, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, OSR guidelines, Safe Schools, Growing Success, Equity or Inclusive Education in Ontario Schools, the Ontario First Nation, Métis, and Inuit Policy Framework or the Indian Act.

Fully satisfying Requirement 11 for the NLTC program is contingent upon the Dean of the Faculty of Education submitting evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the NLTC program includes sufficient course work on legislation and government policies relating to education.

To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide in relation to the NLTC program, for example:

  • published artifacts, such as course descriptions in a course calendar, identifying that the program includes a foundations course with an explicit focus on education legislation and government policies relating to education
  • course outlines for one or more foundations courses that make explicit reference to key education legislation and policy documents in instructional modules, readings, resources and course assignments
  • artifact evidence, such as a survey or other verification from teacher candidates and faculty indicating, that confirms that the material is covered and sufficient.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 11 will be fully satisfied for the multi-session Native Languages program.

Requirement 12

The faculty members teaching the program are an appropriate combination of,

  1. persons with appropriate academic qualifications,
  2. practitioners with appropriate experience in the field of education, and
  3. persons with appropriate expertise in the divisions and components of the program.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the faculty members teaching in the Thunder Bay consecutive and concurrent program, and the HBEd Aboriginal and NLTC programs are an appropriate combination of persons with appropriate academic qualifications, practitioners with appropriate experience in the field of education, and persons with appropriate expertise in the divisions and components of the program. The faculty members teaching in the consecutive and concurrent programs on the Orillia campus include appropriate practitioners and persons with expertise in the program divisions and components.

Additional evidence is needed to confirm that the faculty members teaching in the consecutive and concurrent programs on the Orillia campus are an appropriate combination of persons with appropriate academic qualifications.

Lakehead’s Strategic Plan 2010-2013, identifies that the reality of “one university, two campuses” is central to future directions for Lakehead University. These two campuses are more than 1200 kilometres apart. There is no sharing of faculty between Orillia and Thunder Bay in terms of teaching, although video-conferencing between faculty on both campuses, and yearly visits of full-time tenure track faculty in Orillia to Thunder Bay are encouraged.

Faculty members teaching the approximately 600 candidates in the consecutive and concurrent programs at Lakehead’s Thunder Bay campus are an appropriate combination of persons with appropriate academic qualifications. The faculty at this campus are comprised of 36 full-time faculty, the majority of whom hold doctoral degrees, and 106 contract lecturers, of whom approximately two-thirds hold graduate degrees In total, 86% of the faculty currently teaching courses in the Thunder Bay campus hold a qualification a degree higher than the teacher candidates. Of the faculty members that hold only bachelor degree qualifications, 88% have taken additional qualification courses, in some cases completing multiple specialists and principal qualifications.  Faculty members teaching in the consecutive and concurrent programs at Lakehead’s Thunder Bay campus include practitioners with appropriate experience in the field of education. Of the faculty on this campus, more than three quarters have been full-time classroom teachers (82%), with slightly more than half of these (57%) having 10 plus years of classroom experience.

Of the faculty teaching divisional courses at the Thunder Bay campus, 76% have greater than five years’ experience in a related division of instruction.

Faculty members teaching in the Aboriginal Programs at Lakehead University (HBEd Aboriginal and NLTC) are an appropriate combination of persons with appropriate academic qualifications, practitioners with appropriate experience in the field of education and persons with appropriate expertise in the divisions and components of the program.

Of the faculty currently teaching in the HBEd Aboriginal program, all hold a PhD. All faculty have 5 or more years of teaching experience in a related division of instruction. Twenty percent of the faculty have experience working in Primary/Junior, 40% have experience in Junior/Intermediate and 40% have experience in Intermediate/Senior.

Of the faculty currently teaching in the NLTC program, 32% hold a Native as a Second Language diploma, 21% hold a BEd, 21% hold a BA, 21 %hold an MA, 5% hold a PhD, the remainder of faculty hold other qualifications related to education or native language instruction, and 46% of the faculty in this program have greater than 5 years’ experience in a classroom setting. With regard to experience in the divisions of instruction, 33% of the faculty members teaching in this program have experience in the P/J division, 28% have experience in the J/I division, and 17% have experience in I/S.

At Lakehead’s Orillia campus there are 300 candidates being taught by 5 full-time faculty (1 tenured, 3 tenure track professors and 1 full-time limited appointment), all of whom hold doctoral degrees; the remaining faculty is comprised of approximately 25 contract lecturers. There are 450 students enrolled in the pre-professional years of the concurrent program on the Orillia campus. This data illustrates the Orillia program is growing and future enrollment in the professional year may increase.

Of the faculty currently teaching courses at the Orillia campus, 29% hold a bachelor’s degree, 51% hold a master’s degree, 17% hold a PhD and 3% an EdD. In total, 71% of the faculty currently teaching courses hold a qualification a degree higher than their students. Of the faculty members that hold only bachelor degree qualifications, 97% have taken additional qualification courses, in some cases completing multiple specialists and principal qualifications. Given the size of the program, there appear to be fewer faculty holding graduate degrees at the Orillia campus program.

More than three quarters of the Orillia campus faculty have been full-time classroom teachers (86%), with more than half of these (67%) having 10 or more years of classroom experience.

Of the faculty currently teaching divisional courses at the Orillia campus, 65% have greater than five years’ experience in a related division of instruction.

The Dean of the Faculty of Education indicated that Lakehead’s Faculty of Education is committed to increasing the number of full-time faculty members at the Orillia campus, and to ensuring that part-time instructors have the highest qualifications.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 12 is fully satisfied for the consecutive and concurrent programs at the Thunder Bay campus, and fully satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal and the NLTC programs. The Accreditation Committee finds that Requirement 12 is substantially satisfied for the consecutive and concurrent programs at the Orillia campus.

Reasons for Conclusion

The ratio of teacher candidates to faculty holding graduate degrees at the Orillia campus is approximately 11.8:1. The Accreditation Committee accepts that the Faculty of Education, Lakehead University intends to increase this proportion for the consecutive and concurrent programs at the Orillia campus so that it more closely reflects the faculty balance on the Thunder Bay campus.

A hiring plan has been submitted by the Dean. Fully satisfying Requirement 12 for the consecutive and concurrent programs at the Orillia campus is contingent upon the Dean of the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University submitting evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the faculty members teaching the consecutive and concurrent programs on the Orillia campus include an appropriate combination of persons with appropriate academic qualifications.

To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide, for example:

  • evidence of initial implementation of a hiring plan that enhances incrementally over time, the proportion of full-time faculty in tenure or tenure-track positions assigned to teach in the consecutive and concurrent programs on the Orillia campus
  • confirmation that full-time faculty members teaching in these programs on the Orillia campus have appropriate academic qualifications and relevant assignments related to teaching, scholarship and service
  • an analysis of new faculty hired to teach in the consecutive and concurrent programs on the Orillia campus more closely reflects the proportion of academic faculty to enrolled teacher candidates on the Thunder Bay campus for these programs.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. This period gives Lakehead University and the Dean adequate time to review its staffing on the Orillia campus and begin implementation of a plan. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 12 will be fully satisfied for the consecutive and concurrent programs.

Requirement 13

The permitted institution maintains adequate internal controls to preserve the integrity of student records relating to the program.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University maintains adequate internal controls to preserve the integrity of student records relating to all programs reviewed on both the Thunder Bay and Orillia campuses.

The Registrar at Lakehead University is a member of the Ontario University Registrar’s Association (OURA). Lakehead University is also an accredited member of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) as well as the Association of Registrars of the Universities and Colleges of Canada (ARUCC). Lakehead University adheres to a formal privacy policy that pertains to the collection, retention, use, disclosure and disposal of personal information contained in university records. Collection of student information complies with the statutes of the Federal Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, the Personal Health Information Protection Act and the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA) ensures the privacy of all formal documentation and communication related to a student’s application, student record and academic history.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 13 is fully satisfiedfor all programs reviewed.

Requirement 14

The permitted institution is committed to continuous improvement and quality assurance of the program and, if the program is an existing program, has implemented measures demonstrating that commitment.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University is committed to continuous improvement and quality assurance for all programs of professional education reviewed and has implemented measures demonstrating that commitment through formal systemic review processes for all programs reviewed.

Several external review processes inform quality assurance and continuous improvement including the Ontario College of Teachers’ Accreditation process, the Lakehead University Undergraduate Program Review Policy and internal review processes. Systemic reviews refer to the institutionalized methods of obtaining feedback. For example, course evaluations are completed for each course by teacher candidates, and all faculty participate in an online survey. Course feedback is reviewed with contract lecturers by the department chair.  These tools have led to program modifications and improvements.

Candidate feedback from course evaluations is received and acted upon. For example, PPOD candidates expressed concerns regarding the fact that scheduling their pod on Mondays resulted in frequently missed sessions due to Monday holidays; this has resulted in no PPOD classes being scheduled on Mondays in the next academic year. Teacher candidate input is valued and faculty regularly aligns courses to meet the needs of candidates.

Quality assurance is evident in initiatives undertaken by library staff at both campuses. In 2007 and 2010, the Lakehead University Library participated in the LIBQUAL+TM Canada Consortium survey, in which teacher candidates, faculty and staff were asked to provide input on their satisfaction with library services, facilities and collections. Survey results indicated that students were concerned about the lack of quiet study space in the library. To address this concern, shelving stacks were reorganized to accommodate 12 study carrels and this area is regularly monitored to ensure it remains designated for quiet study.

A further measure of quality assurance exists in the Math Content Exam. Although the Math Content Exam, a mandatory component of the P/J and J/I divisions, was not popular with some teacher candidates, faculty identified that this content exam is seen as ensuring teacher candidate capacity and fluency with mathematical concepts to the grade six level. Candidates who need to review the material in order to pass the exam, which is a requirement for completing the program, are offered a 25-hour math content exam seminar prior to rewriting the exam. Employer reports indicate that, as a result of this Math Content Exam, teacher candidates’ in their classrooms appear to have a much stronger foundational knowledge of mathematics.

The Aboriginal Education Advisory Committee has responsibility for governance of the Aboriginal programs and enacting appropriate changes to the programs. This committee also links to the Advisory Council for Aboriginal Education and, hence, the wider Aboriginal community. Minutes from the Aboriginal Education Advisory Committee meeting, dated January 29, 2012, list short term and long term plans to address continuous improvement. These plans include suggestions for cross over programs from NLTC to HBEd Aboriginal, expansion of the aboriginal arts program, immersion programs and faculty hiring.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 14 is fully satisfiedfor all programs reviewed.

Requirement 15

The program has a Teacher Education Advisory Committee or similar body that functions in an advisory or liaison capacity in relation to the program.

Findings

The evidence indicates that the consecutive and concurrent programs at Lakehead University have a Teacher Education Advisory Committee (TEAC). Although the TEAC functions in an advisory and liaison capacity in relation to the consecutive and concurrent programs on the Thunder Bay campus, additional evidence is required to determine that the TEAC functions in an advisory or liaison capacity in relation to those programs on the Orillia campus.

The evidence further indicates that the HBEd Aboriginal and NLTC programs have a similar body to a Teacher Education Advisory Committee (TEAC) that functions in an advisory or liaison capacity in relation to both programs. This distinct advisory group entitled the Advisory Council for Aboriginal Education (ACAE) serves the Department of Aboriginal Education within the Faculty of Education.  

The consecutive and concurrent programs at the Thunder Bay campus of Lakehead University have an active and engaged Teacher Education Advisory Committee. The TEAC consists of representatives from the wider educational community of Thunder Bay, including leaders from the public and separate school boards, a representative from the Ministry of Education in Thunder Bay and the manager of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation. TEAC meetings have been held three times per year since 2011 and were held twice a year previously, since 2005.

 The TEAC acts in an advisory capacity for the consecutive and concurrent programs at the Thunder Bay campus. Information provided by TEAC members about what is happening in their schools and in the education community at large influences decisions made by the Lakehead Faculty of Education. For example, the decision to install SMARTBoards in classrooms on both campuses and to train teacher candidates in their use is the direct result of TEAC representatives informing the university that teacher candidates must be proficient in using this technology. TEAC meetings provide Lakehead University administrators with the opportunity to invite input and consult with stakeholders regarding new initiatives under consideration. As a result of speaking with Practicum Coordinators about the placement of teacher candidates with associate teachers, the Faculty of Education is pursuing a more efficient standardized process for the next academic year. This advisory aspect is confirmed by TEAC minutes which note that the Faculty of Education uses TEAC meetings to request the input or assistance of leaders in various stakeholder groups. For example, the Dean presented a new recruitment brochure at the most recent TEAC meeting and asked members for input regarding how best to distribute these brochures to reach potential teacher candidates.

The TEAC acts in a liaison capacity with Lakehead University with regard to the Thunder Bay campus. The minutes of TEAC meetings confirm that TEAC is kept apprised of recent developments and upcoming events at Lakehead University, such as the Ontario College of Teachers accreditation review and the Ministry of Education discussions regarding the possibility of extending teacher education programs, and that TEAC often acts as a liaison in sharing this information with the wider education community. Similarly, the concerns expressed by TEAC representatives often result in direct action on the part of the Lakehead Faculty of Education. TEAC minutes of January 18, 2011 note that TEAC representatives expressed concerns regarding the hesitancy of associate teachers to make negative comments on assessment forms for fear of affecting teacher candidates emotionally or hindering their progress. As a result of this discussion, Lakehead University entered into a partnership with both the Catholic and Public District School Boards in Thunder Bay to develop and implement a professional development day on teacher candidate assessment for associate teachers in the fall of 2012. Similarly, the liaison capacity of TEAC is confirmed in the minutes of the January 18, 2011 TEAC meeting at which a representative of the Thunder Bay Catholic District School Board (TBCDSB) congratulates the Faculty of Education on the success of the P/J PPOD and encourages expansion of this program by emphasizing that the TBCDSB would welcome a J/I PPOD. The sharing and updating of information by both faculty and representatives at TEAC meetings, along with the initiatives developed jointly by Lakehead University and TEAC stakeholders confirm the strong liaison capacity that TEAC fulfills in Thunder Bay.

Information regarding the involvement of members of the Orillia campus and their community partners on the Thunder Bay TEAC is unclear. The TEAC meets in Thunder Bay, and members confirm that a report from the Orillia campus is shared at TEAC meetings, but there is uncertainty as to whether a representative from the Orillia campus attends meetings regularly and whether or how information from TEAC meetings is provided to the Orillia campus. The updated TEAC membership list (as of November 18, 2011) and the minutes of the most recent TEAC meeting indicate that the Chair of the Orillia Education Programs campus is now a regular member of the Thunder Bay TEAC and that a report from the Orillia campus is included on the TEAC agenda. The limited TEAC representation from the Orillia campus creates concerns regarding the absence of input from the wider educational community of Orillia and the ability of teacher candidates and other stakeholders to make their concerns heard by the Faculty of Education. The faculty has a plan for inclusion of Committee members representative of the education communities in the greater Simcoe area and surrounding area, but implementation has not yet occurred.

Lakehead University in Thunder Bay has a separate advisory group entitled the Advisory Council for Aboriginal Education (ACAE) which serves the Department of Aboriginal Education within the Faculty of Education. This committee provides a forum for the exchange of information among the primary stakeholders concerning the HBEd Aboriginal Program and the NLTC Program. As well, it continues to provide advice for the NTEP program, until the final graduates have completed this program. This committee meets several times during the academic year and is tasked with providing culturally specific input and community connectivity relevant to the programming. The ACAE consists of representatives from all of the major stakeholders: faculty members, teacher candidates, alumni and representatives from the local boards of education, Aboriginal Management Council Representatives, and a member from each of the Northern Native Education Council, the Fort William First Nation, the Seven Generations, and a selection of other community members. At times, one single member may represent more than one of the aforementioned positions in the group as participants interviewed stated they are very busy and serve on a multitude of committees.

There is a regulatory connection and functionality relationship between ACAE and TEAC. No real separation exists between the two. The Dean is ex-officio on ACAE, and there are other personnel that sit on both ACAE and TEAC.

Conclusion

Based on the information provided for the Accreditation Committee to consider, it finds that Requirement 15 is fully satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal and NLTC programs. The Accreditation Committee finds that Requirement 15 is fully satisfied for the consecutive and concurrent programs at the Thunder Bay campus and substantially satisfied for these programs at the Orillia campus.

Reasons for Conclusion

The Thunder Bay campus is well represented, and TEAC is seen as being advisory to that campus and programs. The Orillia campus and programs have one representative on TEAC. Given the number of teacher candidates on the Orillia campus and the differences and distances between the Orillia and Thunder Bay communities, further evidence is required to assure the TEAC’s ability to function in an advisory or liaison capacity in relation to the Orillia campus programs.

The Thunder Bay campus and communities of the faculty of education are well represented by an active TEAC, which invites the input of primary stakeholders in all the education programs on this campus. The panel also accepts that Lakehead University is one university with two campuses, one in Thunder Bay and one in Orillia. Evidence indicates that Lakehead University has only one TEAC group, located at the Thunder Bay campus, which is charged with meeting the program needs of both the Thunder Bay and Orillia campuses. While the TEAC group in Thunder Bay includes the Chair of Education Programs, Orillia, it does not sufficiently engage the broader Orillia community.

The large number of teacher candidates enrolled on the Orillia campus, combined with the significant distance separating the Orillia and Thunder Bay campuses and the unique and distinctive needs of each community, necessitates representation from each campus and community.

The Committee acknowledges that the Dean has submitted a plan for an enhanced TEAC that will include comprehensive representation of the broader Orillia education community.

Fully satisfying Requirement 15 for the Orillia campus of the consecutive and concurrent programs is contingent upon the Dean of the Faculty of Education submitting evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that a Teacher Education Advisory Committee or similar body is functioning in an advisory or liaison capacity in relation to the programs on the Orillia campus. For example, the Dean might provide:

  • agendas and minutes demonstrating an increased representation of Orillia faculty and community groups on the TEAC, such as faculty members, teacher candidates, alumni and/or community representatives
  • implementation of steps that increase participation and liaison opportunities for the Orillia campus community, such as rotating the TEAC meetings between the Thunder Bay and Orillia campuses, or
  • creation of a separate  advisory or liaison committee that focuses on the needs and concerns of the Orillia campus, similar to the ACAE; this committee should include participation of the Faculty Dean

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 15 will be fully satisfied for the consecutive and concurrent programs.

Decision of the Accreditation Committee

General Accreditation with Conditions

For the reasons set out above, the Accreditation Committee finds that the following programs of professional offered by the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University substantially satisfy the requirements of Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs:

  • Consecutive program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree
  • Concurrent program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, leading to a Bachelor of Education degree, including a concurrent “Native Teacher Education Program” (NTEP Concurrent)
  • Single-degree consecutive program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior divisions, leading to a four-year Honours Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) degree
  • Multi-session consecutive program of professional education with an area of study in teaching Native Languages, leading to a Diploma in Education (known as “Native Language Teachers’ Certification Program” or NLTC).

The Accreditation Committee grants general accreditation with conditions as noted below to these programs for a period of seven years until October 2, 2019 or for an amended period of time that is in accordance with Section 15 of Regulation 347/02, Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs.

Requirement 5

1. The Dean of the Faculty of Education submit evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the theory, methods and foundations courses offered by distance education in the program include appropriate provision for the application of theory in practice.

To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide, for example:

  • course outlines for theory, method and foundation courses offered by distance in the HBEd Aboriginal program that demonstrate an appropriate provision for the application of theory in practice
  • documentation such as teacher candidate assignments or projects related to the method and foundation courses offered by distance education in the HBEd Aboriginal program that demonstrate appropriate provision for the application of theory in practice
  • outcomes of program reviews and/or surveys of teacher candidates/ graduates/faculty in the program demonstrating appropriate provision for the application of theory in practice within method and foundation courses offered by distance education.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 5 will be fully satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal program.

Requirement 6

2. The Dean of the Faculty of Education submit evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee of the appropriateness of the part-time format and structure of the HBEd Aboriginal program.

To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide in relation to the HBEd Aboriginal program, for example:

  • information demonstrating that the courses, particularly those delivered by distance, support appropriate teacher candidate learning and achievement of the course and/or program goals, such as identifying how theory in practice is supported in course work, readings and other resources, teaching strategies and assignments
  • sample timetables for teacher candidates with corresponding course outlines reflecting the delivery mode to verify that the format is appropriate for the delivery mode, particularly that theory in practice is supported in courses delivered by distance
  • summaries of data from program evaluation, teacher candidate and associate teacher surveys, research or other methods of the effectiveness of the practica format, in cases where  all of the practica occurs at the end of the program, is appropriate to support theory in practice and achievement of teacher candidates
  • summaries of data from teacher candidates, such as survey results, and data from program partners such as employers, indicating their level of satisfaction and comments on the effectiveness of the fully implemented program.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 6 will be fully satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal program.

Requirement 7

3. The Dean of the Faculty of Education submit evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the teacher candidates in the HBEd Aboriginal program are assessed and informed of their progress on an ongoing basis throughout the program.

To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide in relation to the HBEd Aboriginal program, for example:

  • published policies related to the assessment and evaluation of course work and practica, such as a Practica Handbooks for the program
  • artifacts to verify that policies are implemented as planned, such as teacher candidate assignments from the method and foundation courses after they are taught demonstrating regular assessment
  • course evaluations and/or surveys of alumni who have completed the program indicating the ongoing nature in which candidates are informed of their progress throughout the program course work and practica
  • practicum reports from faculty advisors and associate teachers that are dated, indicating multiple opportunities for assessment of candidates in the program.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 7 will be fully satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal program.

Requirement 8

4. Upon completion of implementation of the practicum experience in the HBEd Aboriginal program, the Dean of the Faculty of Education submit evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the practicum included the following: observation and practice teaching in an instructional setting in schools or other situations that use the Ontario curriculum or in situations approved by the College, opportunities for each teacher candidate to participate in settings related to the Primary and the Junior division, supervision and assessment of the practicum by an experienced Ontario certified teacher, and appointment of a faculty member as an advisor for each teacher candidate in the program.

To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide, for example:

  • published policies describing the criteria for practicum placements, such as a Practica Handbook for the program and/or other forms of communication with teacher candidates and practicum partners outlining criteria
  • program artifacts to verify that practicum experiences are implemented as proposed for each teacher candidate, such as a summary chart or copies of completed practica assessment forms identifying the length of the experience, the divisions and subject areas observed and/or taught, the name of the placement school, the initials of the faculty advisor, and the OCT registration number for the person responsible for supervising and assessing each practica experience
  • the names of the placement schools, or other approved settings, with information to verify whether the setting is a school or an alternative placement that uses the Ontario curriculum
  • summary of survey information or other feedback forms from individuals involved in implementation of the practica experience, such as alumni, teacher candidates, associate teachers, school board personnel and faculty advisors, to verify that the required components were implemented as proposed
  • a description of the quality assurance processes in place for tracking future teacher candidate placements and verifying that the practica experience is completed as proposed.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 8 will be fully satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal program.

5. The Dean of the Faculty of Education submit evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the practicum component of the NLTC program includes the following: opportunities for each teacher candidate to participate in practical experiences observing or teaching Native Languages in settings related to the Primary, Junior, Intermediate and Senior divisions, and assignment of an experienced Ontario certified teacher to supervise each teacher candidate and assess the practicum.

To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide, for example:

  • published policies describing criteria for practicum placements that reflect the requirements noted, such as a Practica Handbook for the program and/or other forms of communication with teacher candidates and practicum partners outlining criteria
  • program artifacts to verify that practicum experiences for the areas of concern reflect the regulatory standard, such as a summary chart or copies of completed practica assessment forms identifying the length of the experience, the divisions and subject areas observed and/or taught, the initials and frequency and type of participation of the faculty advisor, and the OCT registration number for the person responsible for supervising and assessing each practica experience; for candidates teaching on a transitional certification of qualification, the OCT certified teacher supervising and assessing the practica may be the school administrator or an itinerant teacher or consultant
  • a plan that acknowledges and addresses the faculty’s intention to supplement the practicum experience to enable NLTC teacher candidates to participate, where feasible, in a practicum setting related to teaching Native Languages in all of the divisions that certified candidates can teacher Native Languages (Primary, Junior, Intermediate, Senior); this may include supplementing the summer teaching experience
  • a description of the quality assurances mechanisms employed by the faculty to track and verify that practicum experiences for NLTC candidates take place across all four divisions and under the supervision of an OCT certified teacher.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 8 will be fully satisfied for the multi-session Native Languages program.

Requirement 10

6. The Dean of the Faculty of Education submit evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the teaching method courses for the Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate areas of study in the consecutive and concurrent programs include the appropriate Drama and Dance strands of the Ontario Curriculum - The Arts.

To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide in relation to the consecutive and concurrent programs, for example:

  • methods course outlines for the Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate areas of study in the explicitly referencing content that includes division-appropriate pedagogy, resources and instruction for the Drama and Dance components of the Ontario Curriculum – The Arts
  • artifacts verifying that the content is addressed, such as required teacher candidate assignments related to Drama and Dance methods or relevant summaries of outcomes of course evaluations and/or program reviews.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision.  Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 10 will be fully satisfied for the consecutive and concurrent programs.

7. The Dean of the Faculty of Education submit evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the teaching methods courses in the HBEd Aboriginal program are appropriate in content and appropriately differentiated in mode of delivery for preparation to teach the Primary/Junior divisions.

To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide in relation to the HBEd Aboriginal program, for example:

  • differentiated course outlines for the HBEd Aboriginal program demonstrating the appropriateness of the teaching methods courses for all modes of delivery in which the program is offered, including programs offered by distance
  • methods course outlines from the HBEd Aboriginal program explicitly referencing content that includes division-appropriate pedagogy, resources and instruction for the Drama and Dance components of the Ontario Curriculum – The Arts
  • artifacts to verify that the content is addressed, such as teacher candidate assignments related to required Drama and Dance methods or relevant summaries of outcomes of course evaluations and/or program reviews
  • documentation, such as letters or testimonials, from alumni, associate teachers, teacher candidates and/or faculty advisors confirming that the methods courses were divisionally appropriate and that the mode of delivery was appropriate for the material being studied.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision.  Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 10 will be fully satisfied for the HBEd Aboriginal program.

Requirement 11

8. The Dean of the Faculty of Education submit evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the theory and foundation courses in the NLTC program includes sufficient course work on legislation and government policies relating to education.

To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide in relation to the NLTC program, for example:

  • published artifacts, such as course descriptions in a course calendar, identifying that the program includes a foundations course with an explicit focus on education legislation and government policies relating to education
  • course outlines for one or more foundations courses that make explicit reference to key education legislation and policy documents in instructional modules, readings, resources and course assignments
  • artifact evidence, such as a survey or other verification from teacher candidates and faculty indicating, that confirms that the material is covered and sufficient.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 11 will be fully satisfied for the multi-session Native Languages program.

Requirement 12

9. The Dean of the Faculty of Education submit evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the faculty members teaching the consecutive and concurrent programs on the Orillia campus include an appropriate combination of persons with appropriate academic qualifications.

To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide, for example:

  • evidence of initial implementation of a hiring plan that enhances incrementally over time, the proportion of full-time faculty in tenure or tenure-track positions assigned to teach in the consecutive and concurrent programs on the Orillia campus
  • confirmation that full-time faculty members teaching in these programs on the Orillia campus have appropriate academic qualifications and relevant assignments related to teaching, scholarship and service
  • an analysis of new faculty hired to teach in the consecutive and concurrent programs on the Orillia campus more closely reflects the proportion of academic faculty to enrolled teacher candidates on the Thunder Bay campus for these programs.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. This period gives Lakehead University and the Dean adequate time to review its staffing on the Orillia campus and begin implementation of a plan. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 12 will be fully satisfied for the consecutive and concurrent programs.

Requirement 15

10. The Dean of the Faculty of Education submit evidence acceptable to the Accreditation Committee that the Teacher Education Advisory Committee (TEAC) functions in an advisory or liaison capacity for the consecutive and concurrent programs at the Orillia campus.

To fully satisfy this condition, the Dean could provide, for example:

  • agendas and minutes demonstrating an increased representation of Orillia faculty and community groups on the TEAC, such as faculty members, teacher candidates, alumni and/or community representatives
  • implementation of steps that increase participation and liaison opportunities for the Orillia campus community, such as rotating the TEAC meetings between the Thunder Bay and Orillia campuses, or
  • creation of a separate  advisory or liaison committee that focuses on the needs and concerns of the Orillia campus, similar to the ACAE; this committee should include participation of the Faculty Dean.

The Dean must submit this evidence to the College within three years of receipt of the Accreditation Committee’s decision. Once the Dean provides information that the Accreditation Committee finds to be acceptable evidence, Requirement 15 will be fully satisfied for the consecutive and concurrent programs.

Accreditation Committee
Ontario College of Teachers
October 2, 2012

Removal of Conditions

At its November 19, 2013 meeting, the Accreditation Committee issued a decision to remove the accreditation conditions on Requirements 5, 6, 7, 8 and 10 for the single-degree consecutive program of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior divisions, known as the Honours Bachelor of Education (Aboriginal) degree program. This program is now accredited without conditions.
The Accreditation Committee also removed the accreditation conditions on Requirements 10 and 15 for the consecutive and concurrent programs of professional education with areas of study in the Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate and Intermediate/Senior divisions, including the concurrent “Native Teacher Education Program” (NTEP Concurrent). The committee received the faculty’s report on its progress in satisfying the condition on Requirement 12 for the concurrent and consecutive programs at the Orillia campus and looks forward to the next annual report. These programs remain accredited with conditions.

The Accreditation Committee acknowledged the faculty’s progress toward satisfying the accreditation conditions on Requirements 8 and 11 for the multi-session consecutive program of professional education with an area of study in teaching Native Languages (known as the “Native Language Teacher’s Certification Program” or NLTC). The committee looks forward to the next annual report. This program remains accredited with conditions.

In making its decision, the Accreditation Committee considered the information in the faculty’s annual report, including Senate and TEAC meeting minutes, finalized course outlines, sample candidate assignments, practicum reference guides, teacher candidate practicum reports, program timetables and surveys.

 

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